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Thread: Chemical Equation

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    Junior Member _Anonymous's Avatar
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    Chemical Equation

    I was wondering, could we be expected to "solve" a Chemical equation (not balance it, but solve it - similar to a linear equation in Math). For example, N2O5 + H2O ---> ? where we are expected to find '?'. The reason I ask this is because let's say a question asked "Is N2O5 an Acid when dissolved in Water?", how would you solve it other than writing up a Chemical equation? But when we get up to the stage where we write N2O5 + H2O ---> ? how would we know that '?' is 2HNO3 and not something like NOH (yes that's an impossible reaction, but say someone did write that for example)?

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    Taking a break! dan964's Avatar
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    Re: Chemical Equation

    Quote Originally Posted by _Anonymous View Post
    I was wondering, could we be expected to "solve" a Chemical equation (not balance it, but solve it - similar to a linear equation in Math). For example, N2O5 + H2O ---> ? where we are expected to find '?'. The reason I ask this is because let's say a question asked "Is N2O5 an Acid when dissolved in Water?", how would you solve it other than writing up a Chemical equation? But when we get up to the stage where we write N2O5 + H2O ---> ? how would we know that '?' is 2HNO3 and not something like NOH (yes that's an impossible reaction, but say someone did write that for example)?
    You are required to know how to construct different equations and balance them.
    This requires knowledge of how different ions react and which chemicals are likely to bond with each other.
    valency is key. NOH is not the correct formula regardless.

    The equation to answer the question needed is:



    To answer your question,
    1. gains a proton/hydrogen atom rather than gives it
    2. Using Bronsted-Lowry's idea of acid/base, is acting like a base. (The water is acting like an acid)
    Last edited by dan964; 10 Dec 2017 at 12:58 AM.
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    Junior Member _Anonymous's Avatar
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    Re: Chemical Equation

    Quote Originally Posted by dan964 View Post
    You are required to know how to construct different equations and balance them.
    This requires knowledge of how different ions react and which chemicals are likely to bond with each other.
    valency is key. NOH is not the correct formula regardless.

    The equation to answer the question needed is:



    To answer your question,
    1. gains a proton/hydrogen atom rather than gives it
    2. Using Bronsted-Lowry's idea of acid/base, is acting like a base. (The water is acting like an acid)
    Thanks. Will we learn how to construct different equations or is it assumed knowledge for Year 11 and 12? Also, isn't N2O5 +H2O --> 2HNO3 instead of OH + HN2O5?

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