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Thread: Journey Essays (China Coin, Rabbit Proof Fence, The Road Not Taken, Lee Fong)

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    Journey Essays (China Coin, Rabbit Proof Fence, The Road Not Taken, Lee Fong)

    Here are my essays in 2004 for Class of 2005.

    Journeys: China Coin, Rabbit Proof Fence, The Road Not Taken, Lee Fong
    Dialogue: Educating Rita, Good Will Hunting

    EDIT: If you guys find these helpful, i might post more by request (cause others are hand-written and i need to scan it)
    Last edited by ae; 21 Oct 2004 at 10:01 PM.

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    “Every journey involves some sort of change in the individual.”

    How have the texts you have studied demonstrated the truth of this statement?
    In your answer refer to your TWO prescribed texts, ONE text from the Journeys stimulus booklet and other related texts of your own choosing.”

    A journey involves movements to new places, both physically and mentally and the possibility of encountering obstacles along the way. A journey offers travelers the opportunity to extend themselves physically, intellectually and emotionally as they respond to challenges and learn more about themselves and the world around them. The prose fiction China Coin by Alan Baillie, the film “Rabbit Proof Fence” by Philip Noyce, the poem “The Road Not Taken” by Robert Frost, and the article “Lee Fong’s Story” from the anthology My Story by Dave Blot provide an exploration of changes in the individual undergoing a journey. Through the texts, the composers use various language features and techniques to convey the concept of the journey and how the journey brings changes into the characters.

    In China Coin, Leah’s trip to China with her mother leads to many unforeseen events and obstacles resulting in an understanding of her identity, a closer relationship with her mother and an opportunity to witness the Tiananmen Square student revolution. Through the introduction, the responders are informed of the purpose of their journey to China, which is to uncover the mystery of an ancient coin, thus fulfilling her father and grandfather’s last wish. Visiting Red Star Village results in many changes to Leah and Joan’s relationship. Leah matures and and has to grow up quickly as she is forced to live independently due to Joan’s physical injury. She is the one who now has to pursue the mystery of the coin. Thus she learnt more about herself and gained a greater understanding of the Chinese culture and language, which led to an improved relationship between Leah and Joan. The responder learns about the changes Leah undergoes through Baillie’s use of Leah’s internal monologue, allowing the responders to both analyse Leah’s perspective and to be a part of her. The composers also illustrate the changes in Leah through the use of vivid descriptive language, which allows the responder to “see” and “hear” what Leah is experiencing. The burden to “finish what Dad has started” is now freed as she has solved the mystery of the coin, which will change her life as she can now move on without her dad, which is essential for Leah and Joan’s future. “We are going to have to set about seeing some of China. Not for David, but for us” said Joan to Leah. Leah’s journey to China has widened her perspective on her ancestry and gained a deep understanding of the political stance of China during that time.

    Similarly, in Rabbit Proof Fence, Molly’s journey home to Jigalong is a journey from childhood to adulthood, which challenges her physically, emotionally and intellectually. Through the many obstacles Molly encounters and overcomes, she begins to understand her personal strength, allowing her the ability to mature and become independent. The geographical distance alone created a physical and emotional exhaustion and frustration which Molly tolerates with maturity and strength. The cinematic technique using a long shot of a view of the rabbit proof fence fading into the distance both represents the long distance of the journey ahead and emphasizes the harsh environment of Australian desert. Noyce captures the pain of the journey through his choices of strong images, the heat haze across the desert, digging desperately for water, Molly carrying Daisy, their arms around each other, and Molly’s facial expressions showing her reactions to the harshness of this journey. This is also achieved through other camera techniques, such as the tracking shotof the women and the children running away from the car and aerial shots of them asleep on the ground, collapsed from exhaustion. This shows how tiny Molly is within this vast and harsh environment, which builds empathy and support between the responders and the characters. The Aboriginal music is used to build up suspense and add depth and authenticity into the story and reflect the girls’ culture and indigenous background. The music and sound effect used in the opening scene include the wind whistling, buildings creaking and dogs barking, which creates an expectation that something is going to happen. Molly’s journey home to Jigalong has impacted on Molly’s development, both emotionally and intellectually, and has enriched her through her harsh experiences, allowing her to mature and gain in confidence, but it has also robbed her of her childhood and her innocence.

    “The Road not Taken” is an example of how changes occur in a physical and inner journey. It explores the choices that each person must make as they journey through life and shows the dilemmas involved in choosing one path over another. “And sorry I could not travel both” the traveler exclaims. The physical journey of the poem becomes the metaphor for the inner journey because the poem is reflective and the traveler must consider the significance of choice in his life’s journey. Frost conveys the concept of journey through his use of enjambment, imagery “yellow wood”, word choice “road travel” and rhyme and rhythm “wood stood could”. One’s life is what choices and journeys one takes and all choices will impact in some way on one’s life. Frost’s strong, confident tone “I doubted if I should ever come back.” shows that the journey has led to irrevocable changes in his life, for better or for worse.

    Likewise, Lee Fong’s journey to America and visit back to her family home in Hong Kong has changed her way of life and perspective, ending with a new and unfamiliar life. She is torn between the old world where she no longer belongs and the new world which has not yet accepted her. “I now feel homeless”. In America, she is treated as an outsider, a stranger who does not belong to the American society. In Hong Kong, she is criticised by her mother because her behaviour is “not the way of a Chinese woman. We keep our thoughts and feelings to ourselves”, and is thus no longer accepted as part of her family. The composer uses short, sharp sentences and emotional language to convey Lee Fong’s unfortunate journey. “I really got a shock when I arrived”. In Lee Fong’s case, her journey has both enriched and robbed her and she now finds herself unsure of which path to take for her future, much like when the traveler finds himself at a crossroad in “The Road not Taken”.

    “and that made all the difference.” reflects the fundamental outcome of a journey in above texts, that it is better to attempt the journey and possible danger and change, then to stay safely at home and never find out what the journey of life has in store for the traveller.
    <add your conclusion>
    nidalsinan likes this.

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    Re: Journey Essays (China Coin, Rabbit Proof Fence, The Road Not Taken, Lee Fong)

    COOL to the max .. ^^ well done

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    Thumbs up Re: Journey Essays (China Coin, Rabbit Proof Fence, The Road Not Taken, Lee Fong)

    goooooooooooooood......could u put more......thanx..........:rofl:

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    Re: Journey Essays (China Coin, Rabbit Proof Fence, The Road Not Taken, Lee Fong)

    Here are some draft essays, hope its useful to get some ideas out.

    Theme: Freedom

    <add proper intro> In Philip Noyce’s film “Rabbit Proof Fence”, Molly achieves freedom through her journey which is driven by her family bond, personal strength and determination. Freedom for Molly is to be with her family and to live according to Aboriginal culture without interference by the state. The love for her mother allows Molly to overcome obstacles through her physical journey which makes her realize her personal strength, allowing her the freedoms of increased abilities. In China Coin, by Alan Baillie, the acceptance of Leah’s Chinese identity, the closer relationship of Leah and her mother and solving the mystery of the coin bring freedom into Leah’s life as she travel around China.

    In the opening sequence of the film “Rabbit Proof Fence”, the readers are introduced to Molly’s family bond, her connection to the Aboriginal environment and her sense of freedom, as she gazed out across the landscape and looks up at a bird playing overhead, with the use of Aboriginal music. “That’s the Spirit Bird. He will always look after you” said her mother. Her attitude to life is to be free, to live to Aboriginal culture that was taught by her mother and grandmother without interference, as illustrated by her facial expressions. However, Molly’s freedom was breached by Mr Neville’s order of the removal of Molly, Daisy and Gracie to the Moore River Settlement to “white” the half-caste Aboriginal race. Noyce’s use of “bars” during the train journey suggests prison, and is effective to portray the journey of enslavement Molly is about to experience. The enforcement of prayer before breakfast and only English is to be spoken emphasizes the freedom of religion, culture and language that were taken away.

    Leah’s trip to China with her mother leads to many unforeseen events, obstacles and other new physical experiences. Through the introduction, the responders are informed of the purpose of their journey to China, which is to uncover the mystery of an ancient coin, thus fulfilling her father and grandfather’s last wish. Leah’s search for their secrets leads to an understanding of her identity, a closer relationship with her mother and the chance to be a witness to history of freedom through experiencing the terror of Tiananmen Square. The event of Tiananmen Square presents the democratic issues of that time through the responder’s involvement in the lives of the characters and helps the responders to gain an understanding behind the revolt against the Communist government in China in 1989. The composer used the interest and involvement of the responders, to inform and educate the responders about the events in China during the time of the student revolution to gain freedom.

    The images of the tracker, Mr Neville and Miss Jenkins are flashed on the screen while Molly said “These people make me sick” illustrate that Molly is an indomitable character. She is determined to escape and return to Jigalong, rejecting the European and Christian way of life, motivated by her mother’s love and her Aboriginality, despite the consequences of being caught. However, Mr Neville is determined to stop her, “the cost is more than to just our pride. The reputation of this department is beginning to suffer.” said Mr Neville. During this scene, the readers are exposed to Battle of Wills between the Molly and Mr Neville to achieve freedom. She is made to pay for her Aboriginality. Ironically, it is her determination not to lose her Aboriginal culture that primarily motivates her during her journey.

    Leah’s negative attitudes towards China at the start of the journey are due to her difficult relationship with her mother since her father’s death. This has affected her perspective on her Chinese identity and connection. Responders are exposed to this negativity from the first sentence of the text, “Here I am, about to be sold into slavery in lost mountain in China”, illustrate her inner persona that does not want to go to China. The vast differences between Australian and Chinese culture, being forced to cope in a new environment and the summer heat in China made everything worse for Leah’s attitudes, despite her desire to solve the mystery of the coin and fulfill her father’s last wish.

    Through many obstacles Molly encounter and overcome, she began to understand her personal strength, allows her the ability to do certain things. The geographical distance alone created physical and emotional exhaustion and frustration which Molly tolerates with maturity and strength. The distance and lack of basic necessities resulted in further trauma and pain for girls. Noyce captures the pain of the journey through his choice of images, the heat haze across the desert, digging desperately for water, Molly carrying Daisy, their arms around each other. It is also done through camera techniques such as slow motion and aerial shorts of them asleep on the ground, collapsed from exhaustion. Towards the end of the journey, The sound of the Spirit Bird awakens Molly resulting in the sudden explosion of motivation to finish the journey home. The confidence in ability to do certain things opens up the free will to do it, “they took me and my kids back to that place, Moore River. And I walked all the way … back to Jigalong again” said Molly in the end of the film, to emphasize to the readers her personal strength and freedom that she want to protect.

    The scene in the lobby of the hotel after the Shanghai riots is crucial as the responder is witnessing the deepening improvement of the relationship of Leah and Joan, leading to the freedom to be a mother and a daughter again. In a similar sense, The Red Star Village brings many changes in the relationship of Joan and Leah. After Joan is injured in the accident, Leah was forced to grow up quickly and mature. During Joan’s recovery, Leah learns to accept her Chinese identity as she gains a greater understanding of the Chinese language and culture. The composer then depicts an improved and restored mother-daughter relationship that initially was in jeopardy. Baillie indicates this difficulty from Leah’s discomfort with calling her mum Joan, “Sorry Mum – Joan” she accidentally keeps saying. Leah is also the one who now has taken the lead in pursuing the mystery of the coin and exploring its story. Through the Red Star village Leah finally solved the mystery and ended her father’s quest. She and her mother are now free to start a new life without Dad and move on in life, to choose a new road to travel, which is essential for Joan and Leah’s future.

    <add conclusion and link to qs>

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    Re: Journey Essays (China Coin, Rabbit Proof Fence, The Road Not Taken, Lee Fong)

    A mate's essay, draft with comments from our teacher.

    Journey

    Every one embarks on a journey in daily life. The journey can be either physical or inner, however, both of these journeys interact with each other. The inner journey usually results from the physical journey. One starts out on an expected journey, but from that the unexpected journey occurs. A journey is exciting because no one can ever know what will happen within it.

    Allan Baillie’s novel China Coin, Wayne Wang’s production “Joy Luck Club” and the article “Lee Fong’s story” by Dave Blot are bound by a common thread, where all characters undergo an “inner journey” that changes their perspectives, attitudes, sense of identities and ultimately their lives (good!). Baillie’s character Leah and Amy Tan’s June both participate in a physical quest to find their families which ultimately leads to self discovery and acceptance of their own identities.(good) Lee Fong visits her family in Hong Kong, a trip that ultimately causes her to confuse her identity.

    The inner journey is related to the physical journey (in these texts or in general?), which is an emotional or interior change based on the person’s own experiences. Allan Baillie’s novel China Coin is a story about a girl who is forced to go on a quest for an ancient coin in China and as a result must figure out her own identity. Leah,-the main character of China Coin, has delusions that “she is sold into a slavery in the lost mountain in China” by “an evil Aunt” during the plane ride to China. after she arrives in China she “believe she was still at home”?????. As the story keeps moving forward, the more Leah experiences and finds out during her quest, the closer she reaches into her inner journey which becomes the acceptance of her Chinese identity.

    In Wayne Wang’s production “Joy Luck Club” the main character June goes back to China to meet her lost sisters, which is the last wish of her dead mother; she can now try and be “the best hope of her mother”. The more she understands her mother the more changes occur in her heart. Afterwards she finds out she is the same type person as her mother, that she ”does not require the best quality things but has the best quality heart” (excellent). After she met her sisters in China, she reaches the final destination, which is she finds out the Chinese voice in her heart and better understands her mother (very good!).

    In contrast, “Lee Fong’s story” is about a Chinese girl who has lived in the US for six years and visits her family in Hong Kong which is “a difficult period of my life”. After Lee Fong is back in Hong Kong, her family treats her as “an outsider, a stranger in my own country” who has”forgotten your Chinese way” (good use of quotes). After she goes back to America, she also does not “feel like American” and her “accent, name and oriental features mark her as a foreigner”. She “now feels homeless” and is clearly suffering the effects of anomie.

    There are many different language features used in both of the texts. In China Coin Allan Baillie keeps changing the context to show the journey moves on(good), and all the events are( arranged as the experiences of Leah??). From Guangzhou to Shanghai then Sichuan, during the trip, the first time she met her Chinese family, Leah gettinglost, Joan’s accident… all these events leads Leah to mature, accepting her own Chinese identity and even more it is the driving force to push Leah to go to the destination (what does this mean??) of her journey. The story took place in 1989, during the student riots in Tiananmen Square. This setting is based on the historical fact which makes the story more realistic and attracts the audience’s interest. The characters in the novel have important roles, they help to change Leah’s perspective, and support her quest such as, Ah Key who introduces the political knowledge about China to Leah and suggests a romantic connection with her. He helps to change the Leah’s and encourages her to love China and accept her own identity. (quotes? How the composer achieved this??)

    In the movie “Joy Luck Club”, Wayne Wang sets the story in a farewell party and uses the technique of flashback for the mothers and daughters to enter into their journeys. This technique is very useful; it illustrates the physical journey of the mothers from China to the US and the physical growth of their daughters. However because it is a flashback, therefore it is the individual experience of every character, which also becomes their inner journeys. In his movie, the composer combines the physical and inner journeys together; this technique leads the relationship between physical journey and inner journey closer and closer. (some examples? Otherwise, hard to know what you mean) Both of the composers use an unseen third person to narrate the book. This technique links the different events together and (reduces the pause between different events really? How??). This technique has another important role which is to help the readers get into the characters inner journey. without the third person narrative, the audience would have difficulty understanding what the characters actually think and it would slow/hinder the communication between the text and the responders (good).

    The author of “Lee Fong’s Story” uses emotional language such as”shock”, “I feel homeless” and “the confusion and hurt I soon began to feel in my parents’ home”. This technique fully expresses the real feeling of the character and encourages the audience to feel compassion and sympathy (good). The author also uses direct quotes from the characters such as the conversation between Lee Fong and her mother. This adds to the realism and authenticity of the article and it also allows the readers to visualise the dialogue between Lee Fong and her mum good. Additionally, all three texts use inner monologue and analogical (??), which means the composers compose the thoughts of the characters and break down the events and attempt to explain the situation to ensure the story makes sense. Both techniques help the audience to understand the texts and allow them to follow the story line and keep moving forward.

    There are many obstacles occurring in both texts. It the beginning Leah and June have negative attitudes about going to China, and a bad relationship with their mothers. For Instance, in the beginning Leah said to an air hostess “can’t you see (the others of me??) apart from my hair” she is angry about other people thinking she is Chinese (good quote). And even before she boarded the plane she even thinks China is a “backwards country, they eat raw meat.” (good) In “Joy Luck Club” June has a terrible relation with her mother because she can feel all the hopes from her mother, however she can not reach what she thinks her mum has expected of her since she was still a child. From the perspective of her mother it is a way of taking care of her child, however from June’s perspective all the hopes are a source of pressure, she feels sorry that she has disappointed her mother. After her mother died, the night before she goes back to China the conversation between her father and her ”you are the pride of your mother… you are the same type person as your mum.” The conversation what??? Finish the sentence, explain what this interchange means After that, June was able to identify with her mother and the obstacles between them have disappeared. In “Lee Fong’s Story” Lee Fong is eager to go back to visit her family in Hong Kong, but because she behaves as an “American women” at her “parent’s home”, a conflict appears within the family. The mother complains her daughter has “forgotten her Chinese ways”, Lee Fong forgets the “the place of a women in a Chinese home” , she ”talks when she should remain silent” and “speaks openly of her inner feelings and desires” (good). Rather than solve the obstacle Lee Fong chose to escape from it, she “cuts the visit short”. This is an unexpected journey of Lee Fong, and it makes her t feel “confusion and hurt”. What does this unexpected turn lead to?? Lee Fong returns ‘home’ only to find that she is not truly Chinese and not truly American. In other words, finish up your ideas, Tony and show cause and effects.

    All three texts have successfully built up an inner journey based on the physical journey and each fully conveys the excitement of the unexpected journeys that resulted from the original adventures. Although not all the journeys have a happy ending, people are still willing to go on the journey as the journey is the experience of our lives, no one should try and escape from his/her life experience.

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    Re: Journey Essays (China Coin, Rabbit Proof Fence, The Road Not Taken, Lee Fong)

    Draft with comments.

    Theme: Journey depicted

    The prose fiction China Coin by Alan Baillie, the film “Joy Luck Club” by Wayne Wang and the BOS stimulus booklet poem “The Road not Taken” by Robert Frost depict both physical and inner journeys. A physical journey creates challenges as people travel to new places. Journeying encourages the traveller to test themselves physically and this often develops their ideas and feelings. The inner journey creates opportunities for people to develop and examine their inner lives and to deepen their own self awareness.

    Leah’s trip to China with her mother leads to many unforeseen events, obstacles and other new physical experiences good. Through the introduction, the responders are informed of the purpose of their journey to China, which is to uncover the mystery of an ancient coin, thus fulfilling her father and grandfather’s last wish. Leah’s search for their secrets leads to an understanding of her identity, a close relationship with her mother and and the chance to be a witness to history through experiencing the terror of Tiananmen Square. The events of Tiananmen Square present the issues of that time through the responder’s involvement in the lives of the characters and help the responders to gain an understanding behind the revolt against the Communist government in China in 1989 (excellent). the composer used the interest and involvement of the responders, to inform and educate the responders about the events in China during the time of the student revolution. Like Baillie, Wayne Wang also uses involving stories based on real life events to depict the difference between old and new China you said ‘like Baillie’, but the concept of old and new China is used here for the first time!!.

    Leah’s negative attitudes towards China at the start of the journey are due to her difficult relationship with her mother since her father’s death. This has affected her perspective on her Chinese identity and connection. Responders are exposed to this negativity from the first sentence of the text, “Here I am, about to be sold into slavery in lost mountain in China”. shapes the character of Leah what shapes her character??unclear. The vast differences between Australian and Chinese culturebeing forced to cope in a new environment and the summer heat in China made everything worse for Leah’s attitudes, despite her desire to solve the mystery of the coin and fulfil her father’s last wish.

    In a similar sense, the bitter experiences the mothers endured in China influenced the relationships with their daughters in “Joy Luck Club”, while the daughters were growing up I can’t see how you have drawn a connection between these 2 ideas?(no space needed here)Indeed, the mothers did not internalise the differences in the new society, and tried to raise their daughters in the more strict and traditional Confucian Chinese way, “Only one kind of daughter could live in this house: obedient kind.” emphatic that their daughters should listen to them rather than other people or the American culture. However, the mother-daughter relationship is resolved as the mothers and daughters learn to understand each other more and find the common links between them. “You have the best quality heart” says Suyuan to June. Still..what does all this mean? Why is it important? Why include it in your essay? Your purpose is not clear!

    The scene (which scene?) in the lobby of the hotel in Shanghai is crucial as the responder is witnesses the deepening/repair/improvement of the relationship of Leah and Joan. “Joan seized her above the elbow and pushes her into a lift. Her face was dark and she would not speak.” Joan had pushed her daughter away since the death of her husband David Walter, always seeming to be angry with Leah. At the same time, Joan is very anxious about being separated from her daughter “Oh God, I thought the mob had got you”, terrified of losing Leah, as she already lost her father and her husband (good). The clever method of the composer is to emphasise how difficult it is for a mother and a daughter to be separated, fear of harm for her daughter and Joan’s motherly love for Leah. Most of the readers’ anxiety and tension reflects from the events associated with Joan’s attitude towards Leah. How does this connect to the concept of the journey? Did the journey they took lead to this? What is the responders journey within this?

    Likewise, the poem “The Road not taken” is an example of both physical and inner journey; it explores the choices that each person must make as he journeys through life and shows the dilemmas involved in choosing one path over another. “And sorry I could not travel both”. The physical journey of the poem becomes the metaphor for the inner journey because the poem is reflective and the traveller must consider the significance of choice in his life journey. One’s life is what choices and journeys one takes and all choices will impact in some way on one’s life. Indeed June’s journey to China to meet her twin sisters has altered her life as she found the Chinese voice in her heart. This paragraph is excellent and better represents what you should be doing

    In a similar sense, The Red Star Village brings many changes in the relationship of Joan and Leah. After Joan is injured in the accident, Leah was forced to grow up quickly and mature. During Joan’s recovery, Leah learns to accept her Chinese identity as she gains a greater understanding of the Chinese language and culture. The composer then depicts an improved and restored mother-daughter relationship that initially was in jeopardy. Baillie indicates this difficulty from Leah’s discomfort with calling her mum Joan, “Sorry Mum – Joan” she accidentally keeps saying. Leah is also the one who now has taken the lead in pursuing the mystery of the coin and exploring its story. Through Red Star village Leah finally solved the mystery and ended her father’s quest. She and her mother are now free to start a new life without Dad and move on in life, to choose a new road to travel, which is essential for Joan and Leah’s future.


    Leah’s journey to China with her mother Joan leads to many unexpected events, a similar feature which occurs in “The Road not Taken” and “Joy Luck Club”. Through different techniques of narration, each of the composers in their respective texts have shown how inner and physical journeys are depicted. The choices that one makes will lead to both a physical and inner journey, which makes up one’s life and perspective. Indeed, these choices alter the characters, composers and the responder’s life through…..?. As Frost says about the different pathways we choose in life, “And that has made all the difference.”

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    Re: Journey Essays (China Coin, Rabbit Proof Fence, The Road Not Taken, Lee Fong)

    Tip: If you havent realised, my essays are more of the less the same. So, do couple of essays, ask your teacher which one he or she likes (and the specific sentence/ideas, if any) and then memorise it.

    During the exam, dont! simply just wrote down what you remembered, but its more important to link it to the qs (to get Band 5/6 anyway). Link it especially in the intro, conclusion and last sentence of each para.

    For those who are (really) desperate, just memorise a good essay (of yours), the chance will be you get a Band 4. It is better than to construct one up during the exam, which I believe is technically impossible due to time constraint.

    Cheers

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    Re: Journey Essays (China Coin, Rabbit Proof Fence, The Road Not Taken, Lee Fong)

    dear do you finish any of them in 40 mins?..... some of them ve reached over 1400 words, which i REALLY THINK is techniquelly impossible in 40 mins.....

    sorry man i m trying to complain just coz you seems too good in essays.......
    ChemistryBiologyESLMathextn1Mathextn2...

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    Re: Journey Essays (China Coin, Rabbit Proof Fence, The Road Not Taken, Lee Fong)

    thankew very much~~~ help me alot!!!~

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    Re: Journey Essays (China Coin, Rabbit Proof Fence, The Road Not Taken, Lee Fong)

    Wow this is so useful..

    Learnt so much just by looking at your introduction. Thanks heaps

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    Red face Re: Journey Essays (China Coin, Rabbit Proof Fence, The Road Not Taken, Lee Fong)

    wow, this one is very useful, thanks for aot essay and could you pls help me with the essay relates to both of China coin and 'crossing the Red sea' by Peter Skrzynecki?

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    Re: Journey Essays (China Coin, Rabbit Proof Fence, The Road Not Taken, Lee Fong)

    ARGGHH!!! theres not much on the road not taken n dats wat i need..ma trials start in cuple of days!!!!!!!! HELP

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    Smile Re: Journey Essays (China Coin, Rabbit Proof Fence, The Road Not Taken, Lee Fong)

    hey, good work, but do you have an essay based on belonging instead of journey.
    thanks.

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    Re: Journey Essays (China Coin, Rabbit Proof Fence, The Road Not Taken, Lee Fong)

    Heyy do you know where can i find the Lee Fong's story?

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    Re: Journey Essays (China Coin, Rabbit Proof Fence, The Road Not Taken, Lee Fong)

    does anyone have notes for the China Coin a billy elliot movie, plseee email me plssss you alll

    phibuilous2018@gmail.com
    hoang.bui15@education.nsw.gov.au

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    Re: Journey Essays (China Coin, Rabbit Proof Fence, The Road Not Taken, Lee Fong)

    does anyone have notes for the China Coin a billy elliot movie, plseee email me plssss you alll

    phibuilous2018@gmail.com
    hoang.bui15@education.nsw.gov.au

    Does any one have past ESL internal assessment tasks plss email me too thank you

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