Results 1 to 2 of 2

Thread: Politics,Philosophy,Economics vs Economics

  1. #1
    New Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    HSC
    2016
    Gender
    Undisclosed
    Posts
    1
    Rep Power
    2

    Politics,Philosophy,Economics vs Economics

    I just wanted to know if anyone does PPE, or knows anything about the PPE degree at ANU. I'm planning on going to ANU after I finish high school, but I'm not quite sure about how PPE compares to just a normal economics degree. I'm hoping to get a career preferably in development economics somewhere like the UN or government policy making and a lot of people have recommended PPE. However, if I do PPE, would that limit my job prospects if I can't get into these careers, such becoming an economist for a bank or large firm?

    Any help or suggestions would be greatly appreciated

  2. #2
    Cadet
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    HSC
    N/A
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    27
    Rep Power
    7

    Re: Politics,Philosophy,Economics vs Economics

    The PPE is an economics flavored arts degree.
    By default it only includes a third of the core economics courses (Micro 1 and 2) you could put Micro 3 and Macro 1, 2 and 3 in as electives if you wanted, but you won't get the same breadth within economics as you'd get from doing an Economics Degree.
    Honestly if you want to be an economist study economics, get high marks, do extra curricular stuff, try and get relevant work experience and do honours.

    By and large getting into federal government jobs doesn't depend too much on what degree you did. Places like Employment, Social Services, etc.

    However for the really desirable analytical sort of jobs that are actually "economist" jobs, like in Treasury or the Reserve Bank you really want an honours degree in Economics as a minimum, and yeah if you want to be an economist in the private sector you ought to have an honours degree in Economics.

    It'd probably be possible to do the PPE, get into an APS grad program and end up as a policy officer or something, then do a masters in development economics through the Crawford school and then go from there - but if you're already pretty much set on being an economist why bother? If you're set on economics and want a broader degree with History, Politics or Philosophy in it study Arts/Economics. Economics is easy to combine with something else and it's usually only one extra year.
    Last edited by Dichromate; 20 Dec 2015 at 12:02 AM.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •