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    Good schools in Western Suburbs

    Hi,

    Can someone please tell me couple of schools near Western Suburbs of Girraween, Greystanes and other nearby suburbs? This in terms of school rankings. Also, if the schools are public or selective. And if they are selective the chances of getting into those.


    Thank you

    KM07

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    Re: Good schools in Western Suburbs

    Girraween High School - Selective - Co-educational.

    Fairly high chance of getting in when you're year 6/10, however in between, chances are fairly slim.
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    Re: Good schools in Western Suburbs

    Quote Originally Posted by KM07 View Post
    Hi,

    Can someone please tell me couple of schools near Western Suburbs of Girraween, Greystanes and other nearby suburbs? This in terms of school rankings. Also, if the schools are public or selective. And if they are selective the chances of getting into those.


    Thank you

    KM07
    If you don't mind the train, Penrith is reasonable and is selective.
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    Re: Good schools in Western Suburbs

    Do not go to pendle hill high school.
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    Re: Good schools in Western Suburbs

    Giraween, Parramatta high (partially selective), Baulkam hills (north west), James Ruse, Penrith, Bonnyrigg (Partially selective)

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    Re: Good schools in Western Suburbs

    Quote Originally Posted by eyeseeyou View Post
    Giraween, Parramatta high (partially selective), Baulkam hills (north west), James Ruse, Penrith, Bonnyrigg (Partially selective)
    Forgot Sefton high school as well (partially selective). Some of the schools I mentioned are out of area.

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    Re: Good schools in Western Suburbs

    Cabra high

    Liverpool boys high

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    Re: Good schools in Western Suburbs

    I forgot Canley Vale high

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    Re: Good schools in Western Suburbs

    Quote Originally Posted by eyeseeyou View Post
    Forgot Sefton high school as well (partially selective). Some of the schools I mentioned are out of area.
    I heard Sefton went to shit a few years back with a strict principal and all. I'm not sure about now, but yeah it's good school around the bankstown area academically I guess.

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    Re: Good schools in Western Suburbs

    Quote Originally Posted by baktiar77 View Post
    I heard Sefton went to shit a few years back with a strict principal and all. I'm not sure about now, but yeah it's good school around the bankstown area academically I guess.
    That's because they've got a partially selective stream and you'll be required to get a high mark to get in. Sefton high is the best partially selective school in NSW (in the HSC) no doubt about that. See it for yourself if you don't believe me

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    Re: Good schools in Western Suburbs

    Quote Originally Posted by eyeseeyou View Post
    I forgot Canley Vale high
    Lol rank is only carried thanks to maths though.

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    Re: Good schools in Western Suburbs

    Quote Originally Posted by eyeseeyou View Post
    Giraween, Parramatta high (partially selective), Baulkam hills (north west), James Ruse, Penrith, Bonnyrigg (Partially selective)
    OP mentioned good schools.
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    Re: Good schools in Western Suburbs

    Carlingford high school. . Jks, principal is shit and most people doing general maths are dumb.
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    Re: Good schools in Western Suburbs

    Quote Originally Posted by photastic View Post
    Lol rank is only carried thanks to maths though.
    Yeah they got accelerated maths there

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    Re: Good schools in Western Suburbs

    Quote Originally Posted by iforgotmyname View Post
    Carlingford high school. . Jks, principal is shit and most people doing general maths are dumb.
    They have a pretty good HSC ranking though even though there just a local government school

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    Re: Good schools in Western Suburbs

    Quote Originally Posted by BandSixFix View Post
    OP mentioned good schools.
    lol
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    Re: Good schools in Western Suburbs

    Why are rankings such a big thing in Sydney? Can a group cohort in a school ranked 101-200 be as good or better than a cohort say ranked 20-50? My thinking is if there is 582 High schools (according to Better Education website) in NSW the child who has more motivation do just as well will do well anywhere. I will admit 4 factors go into getting a student a high ATAR/good rank: 1) good teachers in that school/tutoring/mentors- I've heard students often complain about teachers not knowing their stuff or not showing enough dedication 2) parent environment -I've done tutoring for a family before, where all I heard was constant shouting from their mother. In that environment its impossible to do well. 3) Socio-economic status- money (hate to say that. But having money does allow a student to buy books, extra resources, access to best tutors in the state, better student learning experience, holidays, richer and elite network) and 4) Student motivation- you can have as much money but if you don't have the hard work, direction, study technique and commitment it's hard to do well at academic study. Think if you got 3 of those 4 ticked off, your on the way to doing well in study, no matter what school your ranked.

    I got teased a bit back in my state because I went to a low tier school in my state. (one that wasn't even listed on the rankings). These kids also have to overcome that 'inferiority complex' about their 'inferior school' in society, university and daily life. They have to be a 110% better person, than the kid in a top tier school to fit in with society and university.
    Last edited by davidgoes4wce; 21 Feb 2016 at 1:58 PM.
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    Re: Good schools in Western Suburbs

    Quote Originally Posted by davidgoes4wce View Post
    Why are rankings such a big thing in Sydney? Can a group cohort in a school ranked 101-200 be as good or better than a cohort say ranked 20-50? My thinking is if there is 582 High schools (according to Better Education website) in NSW the child who has more motivation do just as well will do well anywhere. I will admit 4 factors go into getting a student a high ATAR/good rank: 1) good teachers in that school/tutoring/mentors- I've heard students often complain about teachers not knowing their stuff or not showing enough dedication 2) parent environment -I've done tutoring for a family before, where all I heard was constant shouting from their mother. In that environment its impossible to do well. 3) Socio-economic status- money (hate to say that. But having money does allow a student to buy books, extra resources, access to best tutors in the state, better student learning experience, holidays, richer and elite network) and 4) Student motivation- you can have as much money but if you don't have the hard work, direction, study technique and commitment it's hard to do well at academic study. Think if you got 3 of those 4 ticked off, your on the way to doing well in study, no matter what school your ranked.

    I got teased a bit back in my state because I went to a low tier school in my state. (one that wasn't even listed on the rankings). These kids also have to overcome that 'inferiority complex' about their 'inferior school' in society, university and daily life. They have to be a 110% better person, than the kid in a top tier school to fit in with society and university.
    It's partly to do with cultural prestige and expectations from the family as well as society as a whole. According to them, the only four possibilities of success are: Dentistry, Law, Medicine, Engineering

    There are no guarantees in life, everything is a risk/reward balance.

    I have a friend who wishes to enter the entertainment industry (Dancing, Singing, Theatrical), and her parents are completely cool with that. The only thing that her mother wants is for her to finish university. She tells me that she does her best to avoid the standard ice breakers like "what do you want to do after high school" etc., because most of the people around her, upon receiving that information look in judgment and patronisation when she tells them what she wants to do.

    Some of us have passions ya know. Not everything in life can be planned, and not all of us want to plan our "perfect" future.
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    Re: Good schools in Western Suburbs

    Quote Originally Posted by davidgoes4wce View Post
    Why are rankings such a big thing in Sydney? Can a group cohort in a school ranked 101-200 be as good or better than a cohort say ranked 20-50? My thinking is if there is 582 High schools (according to Better Education website) in NSW the child who has more motivation do just as well will do well anywhere. I will admit 4 factors go into getting a student a high ATAR/good rank: 1) good teachers in that school/tutoring/mentors- I've heard students often complain about teachers not knowing their stuff or not showing enough dedication 2) parent environment -I've done tutoring for a family before, where all I heard was constant shouting from their mother. In that environment its impossible to do well. 3) Socio-economic status- money (hate to say that. But having money does allow a student to buy books, extra resources, access to best tutors in the state, better student learning experience, holidays, richer and elite network) and 4) Student motivation- you can have as much money but if you don't have the hard work, direction, study technique and commitment it's hard to do well at academic study. Think if you got 3 of those 4 ticked off, your on the way to doing well in study, no matter what school your ranked.

    I got teased a bit back in my state because I went to a low tier school in my state. (one that wasn't even listed on the rankings). These kids also have to overcome that 'inferiority complex' about their 'inferior school' in society, university and daily life. They have to be a 110% better person, than the kid in a top tier school to fit in with society and university.
    imo its kind of like a self-fulfilling prophecy
    1. Good teachers and bad teachers are everywhere, but in a class where everyone is at a bare minimum borderline b4/b5, the teacher spends a lot more time focusing on helping high achievers perform (everyone) than in a class where they need to pull up the bottom (and by necessity pay more attention to them). The pace of the class, and the depth of the teaching generally reflects the class ability, and this can hold back gifted students in some situations. When teachers don't need to spend very much time teaching or explaining the content because most kids get it right away more time is spent teaching technique, strategy and the Band 5-6 discriminator questions.
    2. I think you'd be surprised how much parent pressure can motivate someone to perform. There's a fine line however when it becomes too much of course but yeah. When your family sets high expectations of you, you naturally tend to set high expectations of yourself. Then you either perform or burn out lol.
    3. I don't think money plays that big a role tbh, like as long as you are in an environment where you can comfortably afford to live (I'm thinking like 50-60k/year level). That being said, families with a lot of money tend to have bigger expectations of their children. Plenty of schools in the top 30 aren't filled with particularly rich kids.
    4. Here is I think the crux of the issue. In an environment where everyone is talented, competitive and motivated basically everyone else is motivated by osmosis. I attend a top-10 school, and basically everyone is serious about their studies. Everyone intends to go to university, and everyone expects an ATAR of 90+. You don't need to be very self-motivated to work sitting in a classroom where 95+% of people are legitimately working, compared to a school where maybe half the class cares.
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    Re: Good schools in Western Suburbs

    Quote Originally Posted by davidgoes4wce View Post
    I will admit 4 factors go into getting a student a high ATAR/good rank: 1) good teachers in that school/tutoring/mentors- I've heard students often complain about teachers not knowing their stuff or not showing enough dedication 2) parent environment -I've done tutoring for a family before, where all I heard was constant shouting from their mother. In that environment its impossible to do well. 3) Socio-economic status- money (hate to say that. But having money does allow a student to buy books, extra resources, access to best tutors in the state, better student learning experience, holidays, richer and elite network) and 4) Student motivation- you can have as much money but if you don't have the hard work, direction, study technique and commitment it's hard to do well at academic study. Think if you got 3 of those 4 ticked off, your on the way to doing well in study, no matter what school your ranked.
    Firstly, having bad teachers doesn't mean that you're going to do bad whether it's in school or at a tutoring centre. Firstly it is up to the student to do well not the educator. If the student fails in an exam, who's fault is it? People who have had bad teachers and haven't taken any tutoring have become high achievers themselves. How? They took it up to themselves and learn it by themselves

    Secondly I am having trouble understanding your second point that "all I heard was constant shouting from their mother". The way you phrased it seems confusing, what do you mean?

    Thirdly, money doesn't necessarily restrict a student from having a "good" education. Ever heard of a library?

    Lastly, you are indeed correct. Like I said it is up to the student themselves to do well. Ever student has a different style of learning and some things may work for students others not but if they work hard and try then that's a completely different tangent-they can do well no matter which school they go to

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    Re: Good schools in Western Suburbs

    Quote Originally Posted by Nailgun View Post
    imo its kind of like a self-fulfilling prophecy
    1. Good teachers and bad teachers are everywhere, but in a class where everyone is at a bare minimum borderline b4/b5, the teacher spends a lot more time focusing on helping high achievers perform (everyone) than in a class where they need to pull up the bottom (and by necessity pay more attention to them). The pace of the class, and the depth of the teaching generally reflects the class ability, and this can hold back gifted students in some situations. When teachers don't need to spend very much time teaching or explaining the content because most kids get it right away more time is spent teaching technique, strategy and the Band 5-6 discriminator questions.
    2. I think you'd be surprised how much parent pressure can motivate someone to perform. There's a fine line however when it becomes too much of course but yeah. When your family sets high expectations of you, you naturally tend to set high expectations of yourself. Then you either perform or burn out lol.
    3. I don't think money plays that big a role tbh, like as long as you are in an environment where you can comfortably afford to live (I'm thinking like 50-60k/year level). That being said, families with a lot of money tend to have bigger expectations of their children. Plenty of schools in the top 30 aren't filled with particularly rich kids.
    4. Here is I think the crux of the issue. In an environment where everyone is talented, competitive and motivated basically everyone else is motivated by osmosis. I attend a top-10 school, and basically everyone is serious about their studies. Everyone intends to go to university, and everyone expects an ATAR of 90+. You don't need to be very self-motivated to work sitting in a classroom where 95+% of people are legitimately working, compared to a school where maybe half the class cares.
    The osmosis part doesn't apply to me because of my neurological differences. (Also, wouldn't it technically be diffusion? :P )
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    Re: Good schools in Western Suburbs

    Quote Originally Posted by davidgoes4wce View Post
    Why are rankings such a big thing in Sydney? Can a group cohort in a school ranked 101-200 be as good or better than a cohort say ranked 20-50? My thinking is if there is 582 High schools (according to Better Education website) in NSW the child who has more motivation do just as well will do well anywhere. I will admit 4 factors go into getting a student a high ATAR/good rank: 1) good teachers in that school/tutoring/mentors- I've heard students often complain about teachers not knowing their stuff or not showing enough dedication 2) parent environment -I've done tutoring for a family before, where all I heard was constant shouting from their mother. In that environment its impossible to do well. 3) Socio-economic status- money (hate to say that. But having money does allow a student to buy books, extra resources, access to best tutors in the state, better student learning experience, holidays, richer and elite network) and 4) Student motivation- you can have as much money but if you don't have the hard work, direction, study technique and commitment it's hard to do well at academic study. Think if you got 3 of those 4 ticked off, your on the way to doing well in study, no matter what school your ranked.

    I got teased a bit back in my state because I went to a low tier school in my state. (one that wasn't even listed on the rankings). These kids also have to overcome that 'inferiority complex' about their 'inferior school' in society, university and daily life. They have to be a 110% better person, than the kid in a top tier school to fit in with society and university.
    At the end of the day some you win some you don't. You can study hard all you want but at times you don't do as good as you want however as long as you try, that's what's going to make you succeed in life. I think everyone will be proud of you to the very end as long as you try

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    Re: Good schools in Western Suburbs

    Quote Originally Posted by Paradoxica View Post
    The osmosis part doesn't apply to me because of my neurological differences. (Also, wouldn't it technically be diffusion? :P )
    idk what the difference is, bio sucks :P
    well, i think you would be the exception rather than the rule lol
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    Re: Good schools in Western Suburbs

    Quote Originally Posted by eyeseeyou View Post
    Firstly, having bad teachers doesn't mean that you're going to do bad whether it's in school or at a tutoring centre. Firstly it is up to the student to do well not the educator. If the student fails in an exam, who's fault is it? People who have had bad teachers and haven't taken any tutoring have become high achievers themselves. How? They took it up to themselves and learn it by themselves

    Secondly I am having trouble understanding your second point that "all I heard was constant shouting from their mother". The way you phrased it seems confusing, what do you mean?

    Thirdly, money doesn't necessarily restrict a student from having a "good" education. Ever heard of a library?

    Lastly, you are indeed correct. Like I said it is up to the student themselves to do well. Ever student has a different style of learning and some things may work for students others not but if they work hard and try then that's a completely different tangent-they can do well no matter which school they go to
    Firstly, teachers play a larger role than you think- although to an extent students play a role in their education, teachers also play a significant contribution. For example, at my school (Top 70~) for the past 3 years, 90% of Band 6 economics students have come from one teachers class specifically, where as the other teacher only produced 1-2. What's the variable in that scenario? The teacher.

    Secondly, he is referring to having a toxic home environment. Having constant arguments and shouting effects an individuals capability to study. "all I heard was constant shouting from their mother" - a condescending environment will ultimately hinder a students capacity to learn at home.

    Thirdly, money is a very critical factor in having a 'good' education. Library? Does that come with free tutors? Does it come with finger tip access to high performing books and resources? Of course it does alleviate certain negatives. However, it does not negate the influence of money.

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    Re: Good schools in Western Suburbs

    Quote Originally Posted by Nailgun View Post
    idk what the difference is, bio sucks :P
    well, i think you would be the exception rather than the rule lol
    There are no rules, only generalisations. To be fair though, the sample size for neurotypicals is very large, compared to the minorities.

    However, that does not mean you can impose neurotypical standards onto someone who is capable as barely passing off as neurotypical, but actually isn't.
    If I am a conic section, then my e = ∞

    Just so we don't have this discussion in the future, my definition of the natural numbers includes 0.

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