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    An iron homily kami's Avatar
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    FAQ-King Lear

    KING LEAR- FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS(under construction)



    As this is the most popular text in this module, I decided to write this. This FAQ is designed to help HSC students studying King Lear for Module B: Critical Study of Texts for Advanced English. While I hope it proves to be helpful to anyone studying King Lear, these are my opinions and the opinions of those whom I have quoted and so I take no responsibility for the accuracy or validity of the statements below. Also I have not gone overboard with the quotes, since you actually should be reading and picking those out for yourself. Goodluck with your English!

    WHAT ARE THE MODULE REQUISITES?

    This module requires you to analyse your prescribed text in some depth, and look at how different times and how society’s perceive and value text differently through the influence of their times. Though I think WithoutWings really says it better so I have quoted it here:
    Quote Originally Posted by Without Wings
    This module requires students to explore and evaluate a specific text and its reception in a range of contexts. It develops students’ understanding of questions of textual integrity.

    Each elective in this module requires close study of a single text to be chosen from a list of prescribed texts.

    Students explore the ideas expressed in the text through analysing its construction, content and language. They examine how particular features of the text contribute to textual integrity. They research others’ perspectives of the text and test these against their own understanding and interpretations of the text. Students discuss and evaluate the ways in which the set work has been read, received and valued in historical and other contexts. They extrapolate from this study of a particular text to explore questions of textual integrity and significance.

    Students develop a range of imaginative, interpretive and analytical compositions that relate to the study of their specific text. These compositions may be realised in a variety of forms and media. [http://www.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.a...sh_adv_syl.doc]

    CAN YOU TELL ME A LITTLE BACKGROUND ON KING LEAR?

    King Lear has often been thought of as one of the greatest tragedies Shakespeare ever composed. The date he wrote it is undetermined, but is generally accepted to be near 1600. At this time, there are two “original” versions composed by Shakespeare-the Quarto & the Folio. The Quarto has a slightly more meandering structure to it, while the Folio seems to be more edited, with certain passages eliminated or shortened.

    Shakespeare’s play was written in a period when social order was beginning to change, where previously accepted ideologies were being challenged. Even so the play, criticising as it did certain social aspects, was somewhat risqué to perform in a time when royal approval was of the utmost importance. It should be noted that the play with its political allusions, gore and reference to disorder, were tailor made for Elizabethan/Jacobean audiences who would have understood the nature of the court and be somewhat desensitised to the violence.

    Because King Lear does not re-affirm man’s dignity as many felt a real tragedy should, it was often criticised, especially in the Restoration period. This lead to a rewrite by a man known as Nahum Tate, who made the play less “ghastly” by editing out the Fool, and inventing a romance between Edgar and Cordelia which led to a happy ending.

    It was a considerable amount of time before the play was restored to anything close to its original state. Until at least 1823, no producer dared to stray back to the original version due to the reception it was given by audiences.

    SO WHAT VERSION SHOULD I USE?
    You should use the new cambridge version along with several productions to supplement your understanding:
    Quote Originally Posted by English Stage 6 Syllabus
    Shakespeare

    Students who choose the Shakespeare play explore its literary qualities and the ways in which different readings are possible and imply different values that may be realised through different productions.

    · Shakespeare, William, The Tragedy of King Lear, Cambridge University Press, New Cambridge Shakespeare, 1992, ISBN 0521337291
    Be wary of using other scripts of the play as they may contain scenes which you should not quote in an essay.

    CAN YOU TELL ME WHAT HAPPENS?:
    As Joe_m_2000 has already posted an excellent summary elsewhere, I will simply quote it here
    Quote Originally Posted by Joe_m_2000
    Act I.

    Shakespeare's dark tragedy, King Lear begins with the fictional monarch, King Lear, handing over his kingdom to daughters Regan and Goneril whom he believes truly love him. King Lear intends to stay with each daughter consecutively, accompanied by one hundred loyal knights.

    Angry that Cordelia his youngest daughter does not appear to love him as do Goneril and Regan, Lear banishes his youngest daughter Cordelia, and Kent, the servant who attempts to defend her. Cordelia leaves and is taken by the King of France as his Queen...

    Edmund, the loved but illegitimate son of the Earl of Gloucester plots to have his elder brother Edgar's reputation ruined. Edmund tricks his father Gloucester into believing that Edgar wanted to kill him...

    The disrespectful Goneril conspires to have her guest and father, King Lear, driven out of her house.

    Kent, who has now disguised his identity to serve King Lear, earns King Lear's respect by defending his name. Goneril offends King Lear and dismisses fifty of his knights. Lear starts to realize Cordelia was not so disrespecting. Lear decides to leave for Regan where he is sure to be treated properly...

    Lear instructs Kent to deliver several letters to Gloucester. The Fool teaches Lear several riddles.

    Act II.

    We learn of possible conflict between evil sisters Regan and Goneril. Edmund further manipulates Edgar. Gloucester learns from Edmund of Edgar's plan to kill him and believes it...

    Kent and Oswald, Goneril's steward fight. Kent is placed in stocks emphasizing just how little Lear's name is now respected by daughters Regan and Goneril...

    Edgar, now alone and disguised, describes his fate of living in hiding.

    Showing complete disregard for King Lear's authority, Kent remains in stocks. Lear tells Regan how much Goneril has hurt him. Regan in consultation with Goneril, allows Lear to stay but without a single follower. Lear decides not to stay with either daughter...

    Act III.

    The King of France may well invade England. Kent sends a messenger to Cordelia to keep her aware of King Lear's plight... Lear braves the elements against a storm, no doubt symbolic of his tortured soul...

    Gloucester lets slip to his traitorous son Edmund that the army of France is poised to invade, guaranteeing Gloucester's own future suffering. We learn more of a potential conflict between Regan and Goneril, centering on their husbands...

    Lear is brought out of the elements. Lear explains that nature's physical torment of him distracted him from the pain his daughters have given him.

    Edgar, Gloucester's legitimate son, makes his appearance, disguised as "poor Tom." Cornwall, Regan's husband and Edmund speak. After implicating his father Gloucester as a traitor against Cornwall, Edmund is rewarded for betraying his father Gloucester by receiving his father's title as the new Earl of Gloucester.

    Cornwall tells Edmund to seek out his father saying "he may be ready for our apprehension" or punishment.

    Lear and company find solace and safety in a farmhouse. Lear, showing signs of madness, holds a mock trial to punish his daughters addressing two joint stools as if they were Regan and Goneril. Kent leads Lear to Dover where he will be safe...

    Gloucester is captured and tortured first having his beard ripped away and later being made blind. Unable to bear Cornwall's brutality any longer, a servant wounds Cornwall...

    Act IV.

    Gloucester now blind, realizes in his suffering his mistakes, especially about his son Edgar. Gloucester meets "poor Tom" not realizing it is Edgar in disguise. Edgar leads his father to the cliffs of Dover where his father wishes to commit suicide.

    The Duke of Albany renounces his wife Goneril, realizing that he has been on the wrong side... The Duke of Cornwall (Regan's husband) is now dead. The rivalry for Edmund by Regan and Goneril intensifies.

    Kent wonders how Cordelia can be so good and her sisters so evil. The King of France will not oversee the battle about to begin. Cordelia is saddened by what she learns of King Lear's plight...

    Cordelia has her men search for her father... With the battle almost about to start, we learn Albany has switched sides again, supporting Goneril and Regan's forces against the invading French.

    Regan worries more about her sister's intentions for Edmund more than the battle that lies ahead... Edgar continues to lead his father to the cliffs of Dover where he tricks him that he miraculously survived his fall. Lear learns of Gloucester's blindness.

    Edgar kills Oswald when he attempts to kill Gloucester. Oswald's letter, which comes from Goneril, reveals instructions for Edmund to kill her husband, The Duke of Albany so she may marry him. Cordelia finds her father Lear who deeply regrets how he treated her...

    Act V.

    Regan and Goneril put Edmund on the spot by demanding he choose for once and for all, which one of them he loves. Albany decides to fight on Regan and Goneril's side but only to fight an invading power (France).

    Cordelia's forces lose to Goneril and Regan's and Cordelia and Lear are taken prisoner. Captured, King Lear tries to comfort Cordelia. Albany congratulates his allies but now turns on them. Edgar fights his brother Edmund, mortally wounding him. Goneril kills herself and poisons sister Regan.

    Edgar reveals his true identity to Gloucester who dies from a heart unable to take both grief and joy. Albany and the dying Edmund try to prevent Lear and Cordelia being hanged but are too late for Cordelia.

    Lear howls with pain his loss of Cordelia. Kent is finally recognized for his loyalty by Lear. Lear, unable to take further pain, dies. Albany is left to restore order following this tragedy...

    WHO ARE THE CHARACTERS?

    I have made these fairly brief, so you can basically get the main idea on who each character is.
    King Lear
    Lear, the man and the ruler, is one of the more complex figures in the play as there is some debate about what he truly realises, and whether he transforms from the arrogant autocrat who rewards flattery, to a man worth forgiving. Indeed the audience finds little to sympathise with initially, as Lear invites disaster upon himself by dismissing Cordelia because she “loves him according to her bond, no more, no less” as well as desiring to retain the grandeur and pleasure of rulership but none of the responsibilities. This also is an abuse of the Elizabethan world view of order.

    The storm from Act III is a symbol of the inner tempest raging within Lear’s mind because of what has happened, and is a contrast to his awareness of what is wrong in the world. This ascension into reason via insanity is also a parallel to the sub-plot where Gloucester is painfully stripped of all power after which he gains an understanding of others.

    Cordelia’s demise is the final blow for Lear, who dies of a shattered heart. Whether or not Lear has truly been redeemed or not is up for debate, but one thing is certain is that Lear has undergone great emotional change.

    The elder sisters: Goneril and Regan
    Much like in Cinderella, we are presented with two evil and spiteful sisters who are virtually identical in motive and behaviour, though Shakespeare has taken a degree of care to differentiate them.

    They have ascended to power by deceit and flattery, and once they have gained this power they turn on their father, the source of this new found authority, and cast him out in a competition to see who can essentially underbid the other.

    There are times in the play when Regan seems the most sadistic by far, with an inhumane bloodlust. She takes it upon herself to pluck out Gloucester’s eyeballs then throws him out, declaring “Let him smell his way to Dover”. Goneril is not without violence herself though, as she poisons her own sister in order to lay claim to Edmund. She even perhaps reflects Lear in a fashion with her death, as she suicides due to the loss of a loved one- though not with the same degree of redemption.

    Animal imagery is constantly and consistently utilised to denegrate Goneril and Regan's gender throughout the play. And this makes them seem increasingly repellant throughout the play, as they seemingly betray their softer gender by behaving this way.

    Cordelia
    Much like Kent, Cordelia is one of the few people in the play who treasure honesty as she refuses to pander to Lear’s vanity and so compromise her sense of truth. However in a way her refusal to play the game of politics was also a flaw, as she rejects the commands of the king and so fails as a representative of the crown.

    Later on in the play, Cordelia is repeatedly associated with imagery of the divine “The holy water from her heavenly eyes”. She is the embodiment of Christian virtue as she forgives and reconciles her father, in all respects in this stage she has become the perfect daughter. (A little nugget of *unconfirmed* knowledge, a mature age student in our class with a keen interest for history mentioned that Bethlehem was at some stage a hospice of sorts for the mad, and when you link that with Lear’s state and Cordelia’s saintliness…well it just makes you think of Mary, doesn’t it?).

    Edmund
    Edmund is the fiendish puppet master behind nearly everything that occurs. He is intelligent, attractive, and ambitious, lacks a conscience and has a preoccupation with his bastardy. Much can be intuited about Edmund solely from his soliloquy in Act 1.

    Unlike the sisters, Edmund makes no attempt to himself or others to justify his evils- he does not seem even to be touched with any emotion whatsoever, and uses this to manipulate Goneril and Regan much like he manipulated Gloucester and Edmund. Edmund’s sole attempt at good in the entire play is his small effort at the last moment to prevent Cordelia and Lear’s death. This however is too little, too late in the eyes of any audience and fails to redeem him.

    Edgar

    Edgar is the male version of Cordelia - naive, virtuous and honest. Both have foolish fathers, cruel siblings and eventually both are forced into a form of exile.

    As time goes on, Edgar's stature increases with him adopting a number of disguises and his outlook on life has by necessity changed due to this. This is made clear when at the conclusion he faces the challenge of dispelling the chaos that wracks the kingdom.

    Kent
    Kent is the one who sees clearly for Lear, as Lear cannot initially do so himself. He is also the epitome of loyalty, remaining true to Lear despite being exiled, and assuming a disguise to remain close to him and advise him.
    In the first act, Kent much like Cordelia challenges Lear's blindness even if he must do so forcefully, however his efforts are rejected and a similar punishment is meted out to him that Cordelia is given.

    Fool
    While there are other characters in the play who try to make Lear see the truth, it is the Fool who is the greatest oponent of Lear's ignorance, pushing Lear to see further than what is dictated by ego with acidic wit and humour. He even insults Lear and gets away with it without punishment due to his lowly status.

    In the middle of the play, the Fool in essence disappears- some say this is symbolic of the Fool being Lear's conscience and therefore no longer needed due to Lear's newfound awareness, but most likely certain scenes were lost due to all of the rewrites and editing of King Lear .

    Gloucester
    Much like Lear, Gloucester is flawed in his judgements, especially as regards to his offspring also like Lear, his lack of awareness leads to his own undoing. He does display worthwhile qualities however, such as his loyalty to the king which results in his torture and being blinded by Regan. It is this blindness which helps him gain an awareness of others plights". Gloucester also displays greater humility than Lear, for he laments about the misery he has caused Edgar and seeks Edgar's forgiveness which earns him the audiences respect..

    WHAT ARE THE THEMES OF KING LEAR?(more to come)

    Power & Powerlessness

    It can be seen how power corrupted Lear's kingship. He is at first, an autocrat with the power centred on himself and his want to direct all actions himself, accepting no other viewpoint. He sees himself as a "dragon" who expresses his righteous "wrath" when questioned

    Lear views his parcelling out portions of the kingdom as a great generosity, but it is done in the fashion he desires. He gives his elder daughters the power they crave but in "good time" , as they believe he should have awarded them their prominence far earlier.

    An effect of power is that it isolates. The isolation of the person in power means that there is a flaw in the communication. The powerful (Lear & Gloucester) are flattered and decieved, so they make uninformed and ultimately disastrous decisions. Power also blinds us to our surroundings, which relates to isolation, for the person in power can be unaware of what is occuring and hold the wrong things as being important. Lear and Gloucester cannot see the truth about the children, and thus do not value them properly.

    What happens when someone is powerful but loses all of this power? When power means all, then to be powerless is to be less than nothing. But until the person accepts that life is nothing, and accepts minimalistic life - rejecting all the trappings of power, then one cannot recieve any benefit from being powerless.

    In the play, Lear gives away his position but has neglected to divest himself of the royal symbols of power, such as his company of knights and his love of giving orders. During the storm, he rids himself of his clothes which are his last remnants of authority, from then on he begins to recieve the clarity of the minimalist.

    Seeing & Not Seeing

    Being able to see yourself and your environment clearly is a key theme in King Lear.This theme is reflected in the play by the multitude of images and references to sight and blindness, light and dark, eyes and weeping. The earliest reference is when Lear reveals his "darker purpose", utterly failing to see the truth about his children. Kent attempts to dissuade the king of his folly and begs his master to let him remain the "true blank of thine eye". Lear instead sends Kent "Out of my sight" for he is unable to see fault or merit clearly. Lear does however have another critic in the personage of the Fool, who forces him to re-evaluate his actions more closely and sums up Lear's foolishness with a metaphor "So out went the candle and we were left darkling". As the head of state, Lear is the source of light and life in the kingdom and when he is burnt out, all those associated with him are "left darkling".

    Following the storm, Lear's growth in perception is highlighted when he happens upon Gloucester. The dark humour of Lear's allusions to sight magnify the poignancy of Gloucester's pain. However it is also somewhat relieving as there is now reason within Lear's mania.(refer to Act 4 Scene 6).




    CRITICAL READINGS(under construction)

    Aristotelian Tragedy

    Family Psychological Drama

    Comedy of the Grotesque

    Feminist

    Nihilist

    Liberal Humanism

    Political Criticism

    PRODUCTIONS (under construction)

    Peter Brooks Production

    Richard Eyre Production

    PAST QUESTIONS (more to come)

    How are all the various strands of power and powerlessness orchestrated by the dramatisation in King Lear?
    In your response refer to at least two productions.

    How might different productions dramatise the struggle between chaos and order in King Lear?
    In your response refer to at least two productions

    Two people who value your text in different ways and for different reasons are holding a conversation. Compose this conversation which should include consideration of the structure, staging, language, and ideas of the text.
    In your response refer to two productions.

    In King Lear, the narrative and its dramatisation present a connection between sexual insurbordination and anarchy, and the connection is given a clearly misogynistic emphasis. Can this feminist criticism of the play be supported by your study of King Lear? And how might this be addressed through different productions?
    In your response refer to at least two productions.

    Has your study of King Lear and its reception led you to believe that the play is essentially conservative or does it challenge issues of power?
    In your response refer to at least two productions.

    CAN YOU GIVE ME SOME LINKS TO WEBSITES? (more to come)
    www.bbc.co.uk/education/bookcase/lear/eyre.shtml
    this is a webpage containing an interview with Sir Richard Eyre about his production of King Lear.
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/education/bookc...ar/brook.shtml
    this is a webpage containing an interview with Sir Richard Eyre about his production of King Lear.
    http://www.humanities.ualberta.ca/mm.../king_lear.htm
    this a website by the University of Alberta in Canada, and has a general analysis of King Lear within. It should be noted that while the material is of good quality, it follows its own syllabus and this fact should be kept in mind.
    http://harlos.sitesuite.com.au/12550.html
    This is an interview/information page on the Harlos production at the Bondi Pavillion.
    NOTE: This is only the first bit, I will have it all up *eventually* (grrr, night classes and and day classes) with themes, critical readings, three seperate productions(Brook, Eyre & *maybe* Harlos), a list of past paper questions and a couple of links to websites that I have found. Also if anyone has anything that they can contribute to this FAQ, please do! Caio!
    Last edited by kami; 5 Jun 2005 at 11:42 AM.

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    kami u might like to add this:
    this is from the syllabus:
    Module B: Critical Study of Texts

    This module requires students to explore and evaluate a specific text and its reception in a range of contexts. It develops students’ understanding of questions of textual integrity.

    Each elective in this module requires close study of a single text to be chosen from a list of prescribed texts.

    Students explore the ideas expressed in the text through analysing its construction, content and language. They examine how particular features of the text contribute to textual integrity. They research others’ perspectives of the text and test these against their own understanding and interpretations of the text. Students discuss and evaluate the ways in which the set work has been read, received and valued in historical and other contexts. They extrapolate from this study of a particular text to explore questions of textual integrity and significance.

    Students develop a range of imaginative, interpretive and analytical compositions that relate to the study of their specific text. These compositions may be realised in a variety of forms and media.
    http://www.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au...sh_adv_syl.doc

    hope that helps
    B Business/ Bachelor of Laws 4th year- University of Technology, Sydney.

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    Thumbs up

    ive uploaded some of silvermoons notes
    Age Critique
    Blessed - Critical Study
    Blessed Eyre Comparison
    Close Study
    exam notes
    thanks 2 silvermoon
    Last edited by joe_m_2000; 8 May 2005 at 6:25 PM.
    B Business/ Bachelor of Laws 4th year- University of Technology, Sydney.

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    Thumbs up

    More of silvermoons notes:
    film notes - Blessed
    film notes - Eyre
    Imagery and Structure
    John Bell Lecture Notes
    Kent
    Last edited by joe_m_2000; 8 May 2005 at 6:24 PM.
    B Business/ Bachelor of Laws 4th year- University of Technology, Sydney.

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    Thumbs up

    More Notes
    'King Hits' Magazine Article
    King Lear In-Class Essay
    Lear and Aristotelian Traged
    mETAphor article
    Modern Relevance
    Last edited by joe_m_2000; 8 May 2005 at 6:24 PM.
    B Business/ Bachelor of Laws 4th year- University of Technology, Sydney.

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    Thumbs up

    More notes...
    Ran
    Readings
    Tragedy
    Trial Speech
    B Business/ Bachelor of Laws 4th year- University of Technology, Sydney.

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    Thumbs up

    Also heres something i found myself
    It comments on the end of king lear
    B Business/ Bachelor of Laws 4th year- University of Technology, Sydney.

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    An iron homily kami's Avatar
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    Wow! Good job on uploading those notes Joe
    "You must spread some Reputation around before giving it to joe_m_2000 again. "

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    ahhhhhh! freak out!! my edition of Lear doesn't have the 'mock trial' in it!!! can someone please tell me exactly what scence/act it starts and finishes? even better tell me where on the net i can find the omitted piece in question? thanks in adv
    Now you bring it up,
    I'm gonna ring it up,
    Just to hear you sing it out.

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    An iron homily kami's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by king_of_boredom
    ahhhhhh! freak out!! my edition of Lear doesn't have the 'mock trial' in it!!! can someone please tell me exactly what scence/act it starts and finishes? even better tell me where on the net i can find the omitted piece in question? thanks in adv
    well what edition of king lear is your book?

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    Quote Originally Posted by king_of_boredom
    ahhhhhh! freak out!! my edition of Lear doesn't have the 'mock trial' in it!!! can someone please tell me exactly what scence/act it starts and finishes? even better tell me where on the net i can find the omitted piece in question? thanks in adv
    i know the answer to this question
    the cambridge shakespeare edition that schools study doesnt have the mock trial in it

    that is an interpretation as seen in blessed's version
    B Business/ Bachelor of Laws 4th year- University of Technology, Sydney.

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    Snow. king_of_boredom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by joe_m_2000
    i know the answer to this question
    the cambridge shakespeare edition that schools study doesnt have the mock trial in it
    yeah thats right, the new cambridge shakespeare edition. geee they must have a very good reason to omit such an important part of the text.

    so do you know where i can find an online version of the text? and where i should look for the mock trial?
    Now you bring it up,
    I'm gonna ring it up,
    Just to hear you sing it out.

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    An iron homily kami's Avatar
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    if its not in the new cambridge edition or in a production you're using then strictly speaking, you dont need it.

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    yeah there's a little problem at our school, most of our class use the new cambridge shakespeare edition whilst the others (plus our teacher) use an older edition (don't know exactly which 1). The older edition does have the mock trial in it, and our teacher says that it is important and we need to know it.
    Now you bring it up,
    I'm gonna ring it up,
    Just to hear you sing it out.

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    An iron homily kami's Avatar
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    The *syllabus* requires you to learn things from the new cambridge, and gain understanding from the productions and critical theory. If your teacher insists you learn from her book which isn't the Board of Studies' set text, then she is asking you to do extracurricular reading which you *can't* use in an essay for this module. If your teacher demands you know of this scene then get the play out from a library that is the same edition as hers. Just make sure to remember that you *can't* quote from these different scenes.
    Quote Originally Posted by English Stage 6 Syllabus
    Shakespeare

    Students who choose the Shakespeare play explore its literary qualities and the ways in which different readings are possible and imply different values that may be realised through different productions.

    · Shakespeare, William, The Tragedy of King Lear, Cambridge University Press, New Cambridge Shakespeare, 1992, ISBN 0521337291
    Last edited by kami; 5 Jun 2005 at 11:35 AM.

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    Knight Baggy
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    Our edition has the mock trial in it and my teacher insists it can be used in hsc essays. It is a key scene to show Lear's madness and how he wallows in the grief of what his daughters have done to him as well as showing his sad state as he has realised he has lost all his power.
    Pikelet - Jam And Cream Stylez
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    Quote Originally Posted by markmooks
    I used the new cambridge.
    same .
    B Business/ Bachelor of Laws 4th year- University of Technology, Sydney.

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    quick question:

    before kent is put up in the stocks, kent duels oswald. who wins?
    Now you bring it up,
    I'm gonna ring it up,
    Just to hear you sing it out.

  19. #19
    You're still my Caesar halio's Avatar
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    Red face

    hey,
    do you happen to have any film techniques in regards of peter brook's of king lear -(1971) in comaprison with RAN???????


    THANKS!!!!!!

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    Unhappy English sucks

    I just got back my king lear assessment which I spent so long preparing for. Whats worse is I failed... It's been the worst week ever, and I still have to complete my history ext. project for monday.
    Any wise words for me?
    i'm so depressed, thank god its the end of term

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    King lear isn't an easy text to study. I had trouble with it to, so don't worry your not the only one. just move on and ask your teacher how you could improve and where you went wrong

  22. #22
    the chosen one wrong_turn's Avatar
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    if you have oxford school of shakespeare its much easier!!

    i have some of the notes that i wrote, do you want me to lad them up? i've scanned them...

    BHS '05
    B Economics '10 UNSW
    Economics, Finance, RG146
    Lean Six Sigma, Green Belt '15
    Analytics in a Big 4 Bank


  23. #23
    Hates the waiting game... goan_crazy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wrong_turn
    if you have oxford school of shakespeare its much easier!!

    i have some of the notes that i wrote, do you want me to lad them up? i've scanned them...
    sure wrong_turn
    upload them on here

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    i <3 /\/\0|)s xrtzx's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wrong_turn
    if you have oxford school of shakespeare its much easier!!

    i have some of the notes that i wrote, do you want me to lad them up? i've scanned them...
    that wud be excellent

  25. #25
    the chosen one wrong_turn's Avatar
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    let me put it this way...do you still want me to upload them after how many school days = a lot more lear. i've got about 40 pages of lear now :|

    but i will upload the assessment task that i still havent got back yet.

    BHS '05
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