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    Notes on Agrippina

    On Agrippina

    Quote Originally Posted by Wiggum
    I'll put it to you in brief terms:

    Ambition: Learnt from mother her family was to rule the Empire. Attempted to achieve this by two ways, 1) marry the emperor and 2) get her son, Nero, to be heir. Achieved both.

    Influence: Before her marriage to Claudius, you could say she had influence on the populace through her popularity, daughter of Germanicus. Never really influenced any of her two husbands before Claudius. During Messalina's "reign", still had strong influence yet kept a low profile for obvious reasons. Whilst married to Claudius, her influence on Claudius was comparable to Messalina's and evident by rewarding her supporters with high ranking jobs (eg Burrus as Praetorian Prefect). Aparently during Claudius' last years, she totally dominated Claudius with her influence. As co-regent still retained a great amount of influence and carried that into Nero's sole reign. When Nero had the affair, was the starting point of the fall of Agrippina, as some her supporters, eg Burrus, saw more opportunity with Nero than Agrippina.

    I'll tell you about the role when i'm not that tired to think. It's pretty basic stuff but it'll do.
    Quote Originally Posted by SmokedSalmon
    Heya,
    hope this helps!

    Assess the power and influence of Agrippina the Younger in Julio-Claudian family. (10)

    "Daughter," "Sister", "Niece," "Wife," "Mother". Each of these headings, defines Agrippina by her relationship to the main in power?" (Anthony Barrett). This depicts the way Agrippina gained power and influence in Rome. By having incestuous relationships with most of her male family members. It was the perfect plan as a stepping stone to supreme authority she yearned for.

    Agrippina?s father was Germanicus, who was popular amongst the armies in the Roman Empire. He was also from the blood line of Augustus and thus Agrippina had already established a name for herself since her birth. "she derived prominence from her famous military father" (E.A Judge). Her mother, Agrippina the elder, was an head strong woman who Agrippina the Younger looked up too? "The techniques of the two women were very similar. Both cultivated the military?" (Bauman)
    This establishes that Agrippina?s parents were a major factor in her life even though they weren?t around for most of it. Her father died when she was four years old and her mother died sometime after in prison. Her father had given her prestige and her mother had shaped her cunning personality.

    When Gaius (her brother) became emperor he offered Agrippina as well as her sisters, the highest honours a woman could ever have in Rome. "?[received] the privileges of the Vestals" (Barrett). They were allowed to watch the public games from the imperial seats, be included in the annual vows of allegiance to the emperor and have their figures appearing on the coins. This increased Agrippina?s status dramatically because if Gaius, the emperor respected her, ultimately the majority of people of Rome would.

    After reclaiming a grand amount of wealth after the death of her second husband Pallas she married Claudius, her own uncle who was emperor at the time. This was "?a stepping-stone to supremacy." (Tacitus) because Claudius was the highest respected authority figure in Rome. Thus, being wife to him gave her absolute influence. She could use her cunning wit to have her way with Claudius and hence managed to totally dominate him. She made him perform ruthless behavior including the death of a woman Claudius had considered as pretty. The ancient historian Tacitus believed that "?complete obedience was accorded to a woman" This further portrays the influence Agrippina was creating for herself in Rome thanks to her Julio-Claudian descent.
    She had Claudius adopt her son Nero so he would become heir the throne and not Claudius? own son Brittanicus.

    ? When Claudius died Nero became emperor.
    ? deemed by Nero "Best of Mothers"
    ? picture appeared on the emperor?s side of the coin
    ? involved in political affairs including meetings of the senate
    ? killed off any political rivals

    Sorry about the unfinished adequate ending but i hope you get the idea
    Quote Originally Posted by Sasky
    Hey BB, I don't study Agrippina, but I know how difficult it can be to scrounge around for some notes. I'm taking excerpts from the Ancient History Revision Guides-pg.99-100-others specified (and believe me, they're extremely helpful in almost all subjects), so here goes:

    Achievements:
    Agrippina (Ag) had two important ambitions and she achieved them both. Her son Nero became emeror of Rome and she became the most influential and powerful woman of her time. Her official title was Ag. Augusta, (wife) of the Divine Claudius, mother of Nero Caesar, by decree of the Senate. THe following are Ag's achievements for Nero:
    - She convinced Cladius to adopt Nero and place him before his own son
    - She had Seneca appointed as his tutor
    - She elimated rivals
    - She saw Nero made emperor
    The following are Ag's achievements for herself:
    - Powers
    - Honours and prestige

    Honours given to Ag early in N's reign (pg. 95)
    - Made priestess of the deified Claudius
    - Given two lictors
    - Appeared on coins with Nero
    - Rode together in her litter
    - Recived various embassies
    - Sent letters to influential pepople such as govenors and kings
    - Suetonius and Cassius Dio both mention that Ag controlled N's public and private affairs
    - A rear door was installed so Ag could stand behind a curtain and listen to discussions in the Senate

    Honours and privileges given by Gaius to Ag and her sisters(pg.92):
    - 3 sisters appear on reverse side of coin
    - Given seats in imperial closure at games
    - Included in annual vows of allegiance to the emperor
    - Included in preamble to proposals submitted to the Senate
    - Incl in annual vow for the emperor's safety
    - Made honorary Vestal Virgins

    Ancient and modern interpretations of Ag:
    All the ancient historians we use for our information about Ag were men (e.g. Tacitus, Suetonius and Cassius Dio). In Roman society there were very strict ideas about how women should behave. They were to be loyal, dutiful and to abide by the decisions of their fathers and husbands without question.

    Tacitus:
    - Portrayed Octavia, Antonia and especially Ag I as good examples of Roman matrons.
    - Ag II was not portrayed in this way, instead seeing her as acting in a scandalous way, actually dominating the government.
    - Livia, Messalina, Ag II and Poppaea Sabina were shown as ruthless women dominating their unfortunate and docile husbands.
    - he wrote this because he wanted to undermine the Principate and the Julio-Claudian dynasty

    Suetonius:
    - Concentrated on court intrigue
    - A great deal of his work must be regarded as gossip

    The conclusion from ancient sources is that Ag was a wicked woman and a dominating mother who involved herself in schemes to marry and murder Claudius just so Nero could become emperor.

    Modern Historians:
    The modern historians questions whether the ancient interpretation is an accurate portryal.
    - Ag did not act as a traditional Roman woman
    - She certainly exerted great influence, which was unusual
    - Her achievements show that she did have a degree of political power
    - She must be evaluated in the context of her time
    - She would have realised she could not rule in her own right
    - Yet it was acceptable for her to try to achieve the best position for her son
    - The methods she used were similar to those used by others in the imperial family

    Ag had two definate ambitions and she achieved both. In this sense, she is considered a strong, successful and much admired and respected Roman woman.

    ---------

    Voila. C'est fini. Anway BB, tell me if it helped or if you need me to dig up some more - good luck!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by Caratacus
    A.

    From A.A. Barret, Agrippina, Mother of Nero, 1996

    The Death of Claudius

    The popular image of Agrippina the murderer is based almost entirely on her supposed role in one incident:
    • The death of Claudius, allegedly by poisoned mushroom
    • The evidence for murder here is very slender

    The sources vary in constructing a motive
    • Tacitus suggests that the murder was a remark of Claudius that he was ‘fated to endure the sine of his wives, then to punish them’
    • Narcissus is supposed to have alerted Claudius to Agrippina's crimes (as he had with Messalina)
    • This seems implausible, another attempt to depict Claudius' ‘passive’ role
    • Cassius Dio claims that by 54 Claudius had become aware of Agrippina's ‘actions’ and angered by them
    • What the ‘actions’ were is not specified
    • Suetonius says that near the end of his life Claudius began to repent his marriage to Agrippina and the adoption of Nero

    An opportunity for murder is supposed to have occurred in October 54 when the protective Narcissus went off to the hot springs at Sinuessa
    • Yet this seems unlikely if he was as Tacitus claims concerned for Claudius' safety

    The ancient sources agree that Agrippina was guilty of murder
    • She is supposed to have used the services of Locusta, a professional poisoner
    • Claudius is supposed to have been poisoned while banqueting by poison in a dish of mushrooms on the night of October 12th
    • Tacitus and Suetonius agree that the physician Xenophon helped with the murder

    But the fact that a murder charge is made is not in itself significant
    • Such accusations followed the deaths of most members of the Julio-Claudian family
    • Claudius had suffered ill-health since childhood
    • He ate and drank to excess
    • It is not surprising that he died at the age of 64

    The report of Claudius' death was supposedly kept secret for a while
    • Britannicus, and Claudius’ daughters Antonia and Octavia were detained
    • Agrippina refused admission to the palace and issued regular bulletins hoping for Claudius' recovery
    • The reason for the delay according to Tacitus and Suetonius was to keep the main body of praetorians in the dark until the preparations for Nero's succession were completed
    • This is plausible, but does not fit well with the idea that Claudius was the victim of a premeditated murder

    Finally all was ready and the death was made public
    • Before the news had time to sink in the succession of Nero was fait accompli


    B.
    G. Ferrero, Women of the Caesars, 1911:

    1. Tacitus' story of Agrippina poisoning Claudius is ridiculous. Even Tacitus merely says that 'many believe' the story to be true.
    2. Tacitus says that Agrippina poisoned Claudius because he was favouring Britannicus. But there was no certainty that the senate would choose either on Claudius' death: Nero was only 17 and Britannicus only 13.
    3. The charge of poisoning, like all the others brought against the Augustan family, seems unlikely. From the point of view of the interests of the Julio-Claudians, Claudius died much too soon. Tacitus tells us that Agrippina kept the death of Claudius secret for many hours and pretended that doctors were trying to save him when in reality he was already dead, dum res firmando Neronis imperio componuntur (while matters were being arranged to assure the empire to Nero). If everything had to be hurried through at the last moment, Agrippina herself must have been taken by surprise by the sudden death of Claudius. She therefore cannot be held responsible for having caused it.
    4. When Claudius died, Agrippina must have understood that since the family of Augustus had no full-grown man as candidate for the principate, there was grave danger that the senate might refuse to confer supreme power on either Nero or Britannicus.
    5. The only answer to this would be to present one of the two youths to the Praetorian Guards and have him proclaimed head of the armies. This would force the senate to proclaim him head of the empire, as in the case of Claudius.
    6. Nero was chosen by Agrippina because he was older. It was a bold move to ask the senate to make a seventeen-year-old emperor; it would have been folly to ask them to accept a thirteen-year-old.
    If you have any to add i can append to the information so far, please PM me or post on here.

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    Quotes on Agrippina:

    Agrippina the Younger

    ?Agrippina was born to power and also it?s shadow? ? Leadbetter

    ?exceptionally illustrious birth is indisputable? ? Tacitus

    ?an appalling atmosphere of malevolence, suspicion and criminal violence? ? Grant

    Her privilege to caress Claudius had a ?noticeable effect on his passions? the wedding took place without delay? ? Suetonius

    ?she was striking venomously around her? ? Grant

    ?in an almost male tyranny? ? Leadbetter

    Claudius was an ?uxorious fool? ? Leadbetter

    ?complete obedience was accorded to a woman ? this was a rigorous, almost masculine despotism? ? Tacitus

    ?feminine rage? (Nero?s affair with Acte an Ex-slave)? Warmington

    ?beware the tricks of this always terrible and now insincere woman? ? tacitus

    "She would appear before her inebriated son all decked out ready for incest" - tacitus

    -from Sanchez#1

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    Senior Member SmokedSalmon's Avatar
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    Adding some more notes for stressed hscer's
    Some written responses to past HSC questions of Agrippina the younger...

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    Thanks very much, but what is with all the question marks?
    "Believe it or not, George, isn't at home, please leave a message at the beep. I must be out or I'd pick up the phone. Where could I be? Believe it or not, I'm not home."

    "Thanks, Bridesmaid. Like the beard. Gives me something to hang on to"

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    Question ?

    the question marks are a font substitution made by the computer.

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    Mac Hsc Day Agrippina Notes

    hrmm sorry with all the notes im cleaning out my wardrobe so i figured id shove em on here for u guys



    Quote Originally Posted by JKDDragon
    I think many people want to beat up Keypad, even just for the heck of it lol.
    Quote Originally Posted by GoodToGo
    I know someone who got in. But then Shelley is rather...brilliant.

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    and the last couple of pages...i promise to start typin and scan less lol



    Quote Originally Posted by JKDDragon
    I think many people want to beat up Keypad, even just for the heck of it lol.
    Quote Originally Posted by GoodToGo
    I know someone who got in. But then Shelley is rather...brilliant.

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    Smile Help

    hey! .. im in yr12 and currently have an assignment due on Agrippina the younger and two significant people in her life. I've chosen poppaea sabina and nero.. and wonderin if any one can give me notes and quotes on how their perspective on her.

    If you have any information... please feel free to emai me at dorry_258@hotmail.com

    thanx heaps,

    Doris

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    here was my report on Agrippina...

    it focuses on the aims of agrippina. the aim to her ultimate achievement which i beleive was to instill nero to the throne, through first her reputation of her father to move onto her relationshisp with men to get what she wanted, which was power. with her great influence and power, she then obtained her achievement, whih cwas to ahve nero upon the throne. a mother gained achievement through their sons.

    BHS '05
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    Junior Member Caratacus's Avatar
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    Re: Notes on Agrippina

    Here's some key interpretations of Agrippina, ancient and modern, put together by me.
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

    Poetry & Metaphysics:

    THE MIGHTY FLEA: http://www.the-flea.com/

    The Chimaera: http://www.the-chimaera.com/

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    Re: Notes on Agrippina

    On my site I have an article by Prof. Susan Wood (used with permission) on my site portraitsofcaligula.com " The Incredible Vanishing Wives of Nero" under the tab (Susan Wood) This article is very helpful for someone interested in Julio-Claudian Women, including Agrippina.

    Joe Geranio
    The Portraiture of Caligula
    portraitsofcaligula.com

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    Junior Member Caratacus's Avatar
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    Re: Notes on Agrippina

    This site is fantastic! It will be of great value to students who want to go a bit deeper into J-C iconography. I probably missed it, but there doesn't seem to be a reference to Paul Zanker's Power of Images in the Age of Augustus (here: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/047...Fencoding=UTF8) which is pretty groundbreaking.
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

    Poetry & Metaphysics:

    THE MIGHTY FLEA: http://www.the-flea.com/

    The Chimaera: http://www.the-chimaera.com/

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    Re: Notes on Agrippina

    these notes are great guys !! thanks !!!

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    Re: Notes on Agrippina

    Can someone tell me about her rise and fall of power ?

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    Re: Notes on Agrippina

    Hey, I'm a new member and doing the HSC this year. Feeling a sense of impending doom... but Agrippina's fall from power was because she was heaps nagging her son (especially in his love affairs) and her son had some supporters (which didn't like Agrippina). Her son, Nero, felt quite superior and decided to kill her...That's that in a nutshell if it helps. =)

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    Re: Notes on Agrippina

    Quote Originally Posted by AsyLum
    Quotes on Agrippina:

    Agrippina the Younger

    ?Agrippina was born to power and also it?s shadow? ? Leadbetter

    ?exceptionally illustrious birth is indisputable? ? Tacitus

    ?an appalling atmosphere of malevolence, suspicion and criminal violence? ? Grant

    Her privilege to caress Claudius had a ?noticeable effect on his passions? the wedding took place without delay? ? Suetonius

    ?she was striking venomously around her? ? Grant

    ?in an almost male tyranny? ? Leadbetter

    Claudius was an ?uxorious fool? ? Leadbetter

    ?complete obedience was accorded to a woman ? this was a rigorous, almost masculine despotism? ? Tacitus

    ?feminine rage? (Nero?s affair with Acte an Ex-slave)? Warmington

    ?beware the tricks of this always terrible and now insincere woman? ? tacitus

    "She would appear before her inebriated son all decked out ready for incest" - tacitus

    -from Sanchez#1
    Don't forget she wanted the throne and "would wade through slaughter to get there" That was one of the modern historians... don't remember who.

    She had a lot to live up to, after her mother having "more power than generals", and her mother and brothers' horrific deaths as an unpleasant reminder of what happens if you get on the Emperor's bad side.
    Advanced, extension and extension 2 english, mathematics, Studies of Religion, Chemistry, Ancient History. Oh yeah.

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    Re: Notes on Agrippina

    Increadible! You guys are so smart.
    ANY Hints at all for the question:
    How did the ambition of Agrippina manifest itself during her marriage to Claudius?

    My assessment for ATY was to assess if the written evidence supported the archeologcal evidence. If any one wants a look at it, email me at wouldurather@hotmail.com.

    Thanks!xxx

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    Re: Notes on Agrippina

    hi, im assessing the impacts of Agrippina's first marriage to Ahenobarbus if anyone has any quotes particularly from modern historians that would be great

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