Environmental Ethics in Christianity (1 Viewer)

madden868

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I’m currently starting "Environmental Ethics in Christianity" for 2 Unit Religion.

Can anybody help me with information on environmental ethics?

Any information will be appreciated.
 

.x.Cookie.x.

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There are six key principles that underlie Christain beliefs about ecology and the envirnoment. These principals have informed the thought, writings and actions of many famous Christians across the centuries, including Augustine of Hippo, Hildegard of Bingen, Irenaeus, John Bunyan, Julian or Norwich and Teilhard de Chardin. These six are:
• The goods of the earth are to be shared by all.
• It is important to live in a safe and life-giving environment.
• The diversity of life has inherent value because it testifies to the grandeur and glory of God the Creator.
• Aesthetic and prayerful appreciation of the beauty of the universe is a classic path to knowledge and love of God.
• Attempts at resolving environmental abuses (such as pollution, acid rain) must not ignore the poor, who sare the human right to authentic development.
• A new spirit of solidarity among all nations is needed to resolve global environmental issues.

Christians have begun to ask complex questions about ecology and the envirnment. Such questions have sometimes stemmed form biblical insights, which have in turn challenged Christians to return to their Scripture, theology and doctrine to re-examine their approach to the environement. Some classic Christian texts in this area are:

• Gensis 1-2, which states that God created the universe out of nothing and continues to sustain all creation. It also suggests that the task of human beings is to reflect God’s creative love, and their covenant relationships with God, by caring for the earth as good stewards and as faithful gardeners.
• Created things, whether living or non-living, are created to praise God and to enrich human life. Nevertheless, created things are important not only for their possible human use –in Ghod’s sight they are valued in their own right (Job 38-39)
• The Christian Scriptures link creation with Jesus Christ, the Word of God through whom allthings were made (Jn 1:3) with Christ as the firtborn of all creation (Col1:15)
• Jesus recognises the Creature as a loving parent (‘Abba’) who is concerned for all created things (Mt 6:25-35) and who is also concerned for those who are good or evil (Mt 5:43) The fact that Jesus uses many images from nature reinforces its importance in Christian teaching.
• The riser Christ appears as Lord over all creation (Phil 2:5-11). The human race created by God has been created anew in Christ (1 Cor 15:45)
• Both Sts John and Paul in their writings see the creative activity of Christ as extending not only to all humanity but reaching even to the cosmic realm and to the very extremities of the universe (Rom 8:18-25; Jn 1; Rev 22)
 
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snapperhead

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.x.Cookie.x. said:
There are six key principles that underlie Christain beliefs about ecology and the envirnoment. These principals have informed the thought, writings and actions of many famous Christians across the centuries, including Augustine of Hippo, Hildegard of Bingen, Irenaeus, John Bunyan, Julian or Norwich and Teilhard de Chardin. These six are:
• The goods of the earth are to be shared by all.
• It is important to live in a safe and life-giving environment.
• The diversity of life has inherent value because it testifies to the grandeur and glory of God the Creator.
• Aesthetic and prayerful appreciation of the beauty of the universe is a classic path to knowledge and love of God.
• Attempts at resolving environmental abuses (such as pollution, acid rain) must not ignore the poor, who sare the human right to authentic development.
• A new spirit of solidarity among all nations is needed to resolve global environmental issues.

Christians have begun to ask complex questions about ecology and the envirnment. Such questions have sometimes stemmed form biblical insights, which have in turn challenged Christians to return to their Scripture, theology and doctrine to re-examine their approach to the environement. Some classic Christian texts in this area are:

• Gensis 1-2, which states that God created the universe out of nothing and continues to sustain all creation. It also suggests that the task of human beings is to reflect God’s creative love, and their covenant relationships with God, by caring for the earth as good stewards and as faithful gardeners.
• Created things, whether living or non-living, are created to praise God and to enrich human life. Nevertheless, created things are important not only for their possible human use –in Ghod’s sight they are valued in their own right (Job 38-39)
• The Christian Scriptures link creation with Jesus Christ, the Word of God through whom allthings were made (Jn 1:3) with Christ as the firtborn of all creation (Col1:15)
• Jesus recognises the Creature as a loving parent (‘Abba’) who is concerned for all created things (Mt 6:25-35) and who is also concerned for those who are good or evil (Mt 5:43) The fact that Jesus uses many images from nature reinforces its importance in Christian teaching.
• The riser Christ appears as Lord over all creation (Phil 2:5-11). The human race created by God has been created anew in Christ (1 Cor 15:45)
• Both Sts John and Paul in their writings see the creative activity of Christ as extending not only to all humanity but reaching even to the cosmic realm and to the very extremities of the universe (Rom 8:18-25; Jn 1; Rev 22)
thanks for that...really nice summary
 

maddles07

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cookie whoever you are your a bloody hero. i lost all my religion notes on my laptop when it got smashed and i have two days untill my trial. thank you so much for tputting this up
 

bmfirkin

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There are six key principles that underlie Christain beliefs about ecology and the envirnoment. These principals have informed the thought, writings and actions of many famous Christians across the centuries, including Augustine of Hippo, Hildegard of Bingen, Irenaeus, John Bunyan, Julian or Norwich and Teilhard de Chardin. These six are:
• The goods of the earth are to be shared by all.
• It is important to live in a safe and life-giving environment.
• The diversity of life has inherent value because it testifies to the grandeur and glory of God the Creator.
• Aesthetic and prayerful appreciation of the beauty of the universe is a classic path to knowledge and love of God.
• Attempts at resolving environmental abuses (such as pollution, acid rain) must not ignore the poor, who sare the human right to authentic development.
• A new spirit of solidarity among all nations is needed to resolve global environmental issues.

Christians have begun to ask complex questions about ecology and the envirnment. Such questions have sometimes stemmed form biblical insights, which have in turn challenged Christians to return to their Scripture, theology and doctrine to re-examine their approach to the environement. Some classic Christian texts in this area are:

• Gensis 1-2, which states that God created the universe out of nothing and continues to sustain all creation. It also suggests that the task of human beings is to reflect God’s creative love, and their covenant relationships with God, by caring for the earth as good stewards and as faithful gardeners.
• Created things, whether living or non-living, are created to praise God and to enrich human life. Nevertheless, created things are important not only for their possible human use –in Ghod’s sight they are valued in their own right (Job 38-39)
• The Christian Scriptures link creation with Jesus Christ, the Word of God through whom allthings were made (Jn 1:3) with Christ as the firtborn of all creation (Col1:15)
• Jesus recognises the Creature as a loving parent (‘Abba’) who is concerned for all created things (Mt 6:25-35) and who is also concerned for those who are good or evil (Mt 5:43) The fact that Jesus uses many images from nature reinforces its importance in Christian teaching.
• The riser Christ appears as Lord over all creation (Phil 2:5-11). The human race created by God has been created anew in Christ (1 Cor 15:45)
• Both Sts John and Paul in their writings see the creative activity of Christ as extending not only to all humanity but reaching even to the cosmic realm and to the very extremities of the universe (Rom 8:18-25; Jn 1; Rev 22)
thanks man.
 

blackwiggle

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Cookie thankyou
im really stuffed with this topic and your notes are like seeing light at the end of the tunnel
thankyou thankyou thankyou!
:d
 

Woteva636

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Thanks so much, i've been learning about bio-ethics, but my teacher is so dodgy i might just learn what i can from here and supplement it with google, then see how i go in my trials.
 

bored of sc

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There are six key principles that underlie Christain beliefs about ecology and the envirnoment. These principals have informed the thought, writings and actions of many famous Christians across the centuries, including Augustine of Hippo, Hildegard of Bingen, Irenaeus, John Bunyan, Julian or Norwich and Teilhard de Chardin. These six are:
• The goods of the earth are to be shared by all.
• It is important to live in a safe and life-giving environment.
• The diversity of life has inherent value because it testifies to the grandeur and glory of God the Creator.
• Aesthetic and prayerful appreciation of the beauty of the universe is a classic path to knowledge and love of God.
• Attempts at resolving environmental abuses (such as pollution, acid rain) must not ignore the poor, who sare the human right to authentic development.
• A new spirit of solidarity among all nations is needed to resolve global environmental issues.

Christians have begun to ask complex questions about ecology and the envirnment. Such questions have sometimes stemmed form biblical insights, which have in turn challenged Christians to return to their Scripture, theology and doctrine to re-examine their approach to the environement. Some classic Christian texts in this area are:

• Gensis 1-2, which states that God created the universe out of nothing and continues to sustain all creation. It also suggests that the task of human beings is to reflect God’s creative love, and their covenant relationships with God, by caring for the earth as good stewards and as faithful gardeners.
• Created things, whether living or non-living, are created to praise God and to enrich human life. Nevertheless, created things are important not only for their possible human use –in Ghod’s sight they are valued in their own right (Job 38-39)
• The Christian Scriptures link creation with Jesus Christ, the Word of God through whom allthings were made (Jn 1:3) with Christ as the firtborn of all creation (Col1:15)
• Jesus recognises the Creature as a loving parent (‘Abba’) who is concerned for all created things (Mt 6:25-35) and who is also concerned for those who are good or evil (Mt 5:43) The fact that Jesus uses many images from nature reinforces its importance in Christian teaching.
• The riser Christ appears as Lord over all creation (Phil 2:5-11). The human race created by God has been created anew in Christ (1 Cor 15:45)
• Both Sts John and Paul in their writings see the creative activity of Christ as extending not only to all humanity but reaching even to the cosmic realm and to the very extremities of the universe (Rom 8:18-25; Jn 1; Rev 22)
This is taken from the textbook Living Religion Third Edition for those who want to know. It's a good summary but it is quite one sided. Christians have also done some things which definitely not environmentally friendly.
 
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snapperhead

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This is taken from the textbook Living Religion Third Edition for those who want to know. It's a good summary but it is quite one sided. Christians have also done some things which definitely not environmentally friendly.
so has every group, minority and individual!

Gotta look at the big picture and not lump the little stuff in to the effort to rectify the problem otherwise you go backwards!

Plus its not really the point of the syllabus/course.........
 

POPPETS

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sorry, but where in the book? which page is it on? >____<
 

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