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Investigating Science Anyone? (1 Viewer)

myopic_owl22

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Subject selection is coming up really soon (yeah, my school does things really late...), and I was wondering if I should be considering Investigating Science. I've read the syllabuses for Investigating, Physics, Biology and Chemistry and am currently under the assumption that all the societal implications of each old syllabus will be taken out, expanded and repackaged into the investigating science course.

I'm interested in the modelling, theories and cause & effect topics, but not so much with the history/ society stuff. I'm also a bit wary about the 60 hours of depth studies i'll have to do during year 11 and 12, which is double the amount other sciences require.

Since our grade will be the first to choose it, a lot of things are up in the air... is it worth the 'risk'? That is:
i) Will studying it with another science help me with that science or vice versa?
ii) Will I have enough resources (and what will be expected of me)?
iii) Will it scale well (i.e. will intelligent kids do this subject)?

I love learning scientific content and applying them to real-world situations, so I'd really like to do 6 units of science - physics, chemistry and either bio or investigating depending on who else is doing/ considering it. So anyone's opinion on this will be greatly appreciated! Thanks :)
 

girlyoudontknow

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hey, im in year 10 too... in terms of scaling i personally don't think it will scale very well. Since you asked if 'intelligent kids' will do the subject the smarties in my grade did not choose it, and the grade required to pick a course for my grade was a D whereas phys and chem were B in science,english and math so i don't think it'll be a really hard course. My friend who is just like you (really loves science) he's picked chem,bio and physics AND considering science extension - during our subject talks apparently by the end of the year they'll let us know if there will be a science extension course might wanna consider that ;)
 

myopic_owl22

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Thanks a bunch! I'll probably stick with biology then. I'll also certainly look into any extension science courses - thanks for letting me know about them!
Best wishes for the next 2 years ahead... :)
 

myopic_owl22

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So I had a subject selection info evening a few nights ago, and asked about extension science - turns out it's basically a re-branding of investigating science. It's a year 12 course where you pick a major (in one of the sciences) and look at the science behind the science (that is, proving theories and validating conjectures, etc) of that science.

My head teacher also said that investigating science < science extension. Basically, science extension is harder (because it's more specific) & will need more work than investigating science. It seems to be following the same template of the extension history syllabus - no new content, just understanding the inquiry process and analysing/ interpreting others (and your own) data.

With this new course in year 12 for 2019ers, the maximum science units you can do is 7.

Thought I would stick this info up on BOS for anyone who's interested in Investigating/ Extension Science. Hope it helps!
 

Sci guy

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A bit after the event I know, but I wouldn't characterise the course as all the stuff dropped from the old syllabus at all. It essentially looks at the process of science. Although the other courses do cover this to a degree it is overshadowed by the huge amount of subject specific content. You could ask a student leaving year 11 or 12 biology about the scientific method and they would likely not be able to tell you a single thing other than the need for validity and reliability in an experiment. How one would truly go about achieving this would probably evade them other than saying repeat the experiment three times... a gross misrepresentation of the kind of repetition that is usually required. I guess there is a lot of stuff on the history and philosophy of science and how scientists came to their conclusions. But if you want to know why we don't any longer think the world is flat, the universe is eternal, foul smelling air causes disease and things burn due to phlogiston and rather appreciate that all science is built on the shoulders of scientific giants then this course should appeal to you. Saying that... how will it scale? Well only time will tell but like all courses... they only scale well if you do well in them. Do crappy in chemistry and no amount of scaling will help you... in fact it will likely have the opposite effect.
 
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