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Medicine at UNSW or Newcastle JMP (1 Viewer)

Renaaa

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lol sorry was having a bad day. Eitherway i got annoyed at the 'there is often confusion on whether you can do surgery- because of the name- tbh I'm not even sure myself!'
I think if you're not sure, then you simply shouldn't give advice that could mislead people. Most your points regarding the degree not being recognised in other places are also irrelevant because as far as registration overseas goes, you would be registered in Australia and most graduates would be in the same boat.

Again, apologies for calling you an ignorant but a lot of the stuff you said were simply incorrect.

With regards to everything else you said, most of it has been corrected by others so ye. Anyway, soz. we cool
You will be registered in Australia but perhaps not in other countries.

Take for example, Singapore: http://www.healthprofessionals.gov.... Registrable Basic Medical Qualifications.pdf

In this case, JMP Newcastle is recognised, however UWS or Bond University is not. Similarly in other countries, there may be governments who recognise a Newcastle degree but not a UNSW one.

As such, I disagree about my point not being relevant- degrees may not be recognised in other places. I already stated multiple times that in Australia- we are all recognised uniformly; and I was specifically talking about overseas. I feel you shouldn't really give advice about subjects you aren't too sure either! (Sorry if this seems passive aggressive. I also disagree that my views are incorrect. I simply feel you have a different opinion on issues.

Moral of the story is: If you intend to work overseas or in a particular country (I know people who do), it is best you check the regulations and rules of that country before choosing your university.

I hope this helps.
 
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Renaaa

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Sorry, you were unclear in your question:

If instead you were talking about a medical degree, then I would have told you that all medical degrees are recognised interstate.

In any case, OP would do well to apply for both. I think a research year can be more helpful if you have a good idea of where you will be in your PGY2-4 as it will be most helpful during this period. However, in the early years, one year of clinical experience is more helpful than one year of research: a PGY2 without research experience will generally have more opportunities than a PGY1 with research in the same field.
Again, I disagree. However, this is based on who you talk to and your own personal experience. Personally, I have been advised by upper years and interns to get involved in research projects as much as possible (even as a side project).

Ultimately, we both have our own personal opinions.

Also why do people keep picking on this! I have said in ALL my posts that medical degrees are recognised equally across Australia. I was referring to surgical terms specifically as I saw 2 interns during their general surgery rotation being questioned on how long their surgical rotations were in Med School and where they did them. There was also comparisons on how XX place wasn't as good or how YY time was too short.
 
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Renaaa

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I agree with everything else you have said but i disagree with 1 year not being enough time to get published! Once you look at the number of medical journals out there, you'll soon realise it's not insanely difficult to get stuff published and people do summer research projects in medicine that get published all the time (3months time frame). But yeah obvsly the quality of research is not going to be something that will be published in NEJM but I feel like ILP gives you a very good time-frame to conduct proper research and be published if you are committed enough (I think it's the longest research time-frame for any medical degree in australia for that matter actually that is built into the program - Most other medical schools you tend to take a year off if you want to conduct proper research)
Most ILP research are on a negotiated or new topic, which is why Oer said it is quite hard to get published. Most studies also involve collecting extensive data or running clinical trials- Both which likely take more than 3 months unless your supervisor already has a huge team working on this project or if you just publish a really small bit of research. Based on current research projects in my year, alot of us are managing our projects ourselves (self directed learning) as our supervisors are super super busy. Again this contributes to the one year struggle.
 
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louielouiee

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As someone who applied to every single state and only got one offer, apply everywhere, THEN make your decision.

It was scary at first moving from Sydney, but I know have a great life up here and have experienced more of Australia in the past 4 years than I could have ever imagined. My decision was also based on not fucking around with the UMAT and GAMSAT ever again.

Don't be afraid of change!
 
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bangladesh

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Most ILP research are on a negotiated or new topic, which is why Oer said it is quite hard to get published. Most studies also involve collecting extensive data or running clinical trials- Both which likely take more than 3 months unless your supervisor already has a huge team working on this project or if you just publish a really small bit of research. Based on current research projects in my year, alot of us are managing our projects ourselves (self directed learning) as our supervisors are super super busy. Again this contributes to the one year struggle.
lol, i dont understand what point you're trying to make?
 

Renaaa

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lol, i dont understand what point you're trying to make?
I don't see what's 'lol' about this :p Point that I'm trying to say UNSW ILP Projects vs 3 month summer research internship are entirely differently. 3 month summer research- you are often 'added' on to a pre-existing research or a small part of a research project. ILP alot of the projects are negotiated and new, determined between students and supervisors- Hence, it might be difficult to publish within a year (as this requires data to be collected blah blah)

If you have any questions, maybe just message me instead? Because I feel this is deviating from the chat thread greatly!
 

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Again, I disagree. However, this is based on who you talk to and your own personal experience. Personally, I have been advised by upper years and interns to get involved in research projects as much as possible (even as a side project).

Ultimately, we both have our own personal opinions.
It should be clear from my previous statement that I am not disputing that research can be helpful. Indeed, you can take on research without a research year or even after graduation. What I am saying is that a number of training programs require that you undertake more than an internship before entry (two years), excluding any PGY1s from even being considered. I am not sure with what you are disagreeing with here.

Also why do people keep picking on this! I have said in ALL my posts that medical degrees are recognised equally across Australia. I was referring to surgical terms specifically as I saw 2 interns during their general surgery rotation being questioned on how long their surgical rotations were in Med School and where they did them. There was also comparisons on how XX place wasn't as good or how YY time was too short.
I was pointing out that you were unclear in your statement in that however it was interpreted, it did not make sense. Not a point worth pursuing.

Regarding your example, who was asking the questions? How much do their opinions matter - both interns clearly got the same job anyway!

UNSW MED degree is also more recognised in some Asian countries compared to Newcastle.
Which ones are these, out of interest?
 
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Renaaa

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It should be clear from my previous statement that I am not disputing that research can be helpful. Indeed, you can take on research without a research year or even after graduation. What I am saying is that a number of training programs require that you undertake more than an internship before entry (two years), excluding any PGY1s from even being considered. I am not sure with what you are disagreeing with here.


I was pointing out that you were unclear in your statement in that however it was interpreted, it did not make sense. Not a point worth pursuing.

Regarding your example, who was asking the questions? How much do their opinions matter - both interns clearly got the same job anyway!


Which ones are these, out of interest?
Tbh, I think this discussion has reached a standpoint where everyone is going on and on about the same things. If you have any questions PM me instead of pursuing it on a 2 week old reply. Strange how you mentioned how 'not a point worth pursuing' was one you pursued as well. Clearly to begin with, I wasn't too sure what you were talking about too !;-;

I have heard when doing medical placements in Singapore, HK and Taiwan on potential bias towards UNSW, Melbourne, Monash and Usyd students provided you pass the language tests. In Singapore, graduates from UNSW tend to be seen as a 'higher standard' than Newcastle. With regard to being employed in different countries, Newcastle is recognised in Singapore as a medical degree but not UWS (Refer to my earlier post). As such, it is possible that in other countries, different university degrees and recognise to different extents too.

Honestly, please just message me if you want to talk this out as this has far gone past the original post/meaning of this thread. It really feels more of 'defending each other points/you are wrong' rather than actual discussion.
 
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