woman tattoos "do not resus" on chest (1 Viewer)

vodkacrumble

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http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/2819149.stm

fabulous! :D

i printed it off and stuck it at the nurses station at work.

i've already told people around me that if i'm ever ill enough to be placed in a nursing home (due to aging process or misadventure) i'm to be made palliative care immediately. none of this sending me to hospital because i have a UTI crap. just pump me with morphine and haliperidol to settle me, and let the respiratory failure do the rest.
 

mr_brightside

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Its a good idea.
But dont they HAVE to resusitate someone or something?
oh I dunno
*sleeps*
 

vodkacrumble

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yeah, they probably would - but if they see it and check her handbag they'd see her wishes.

but the article was 3 years ago, she's probably passed away since.
 

iamsickofyear12

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You can choose not to be resuscitated but a tattoo isn't legal. A doctor would do it anyway unless there was something in the medical records or something legal that they could go by.
 

White Rabbit

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You need offical NFR/Critical Orders that are signed by doctors, the patient/legal guardian, and only after social workers and psychologists and psychiatrists etc to ensure the family and pt know what the consequences are, what other options are available and so on and so forth. Obvisously it's full of legal implications and red tape and, as such it takes a while to go through.
 

vodkacrumble

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an NFR order is never signed by the pt/gardian, half the pts where i work are NFR and it's just signed by the MO. and social workers & psychologists are rarely, if ever, involved. i've never seen a psychologist on the ward!
 

White Rabbit

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Thats ridiculous, of course the pt or the pts family would need to consent to critical orders - if we can't do something as simple as a BSL without consent, how would we get away with letting someone die. Everywhere I've worked, the MO, the family and social work (occasionally pysch) would all be involved, have a conference and ultimatley the family would decide if the pt wasn't legally in a position to consent. It's a grey area , but the pt/guardian def. needs to consent or else you get done for negligence and criminal indifference if he arrests and he dies without an NFR order.

What hospital to do work at? All that I've worked as I see as many social workers as I do physios and OTs. Psychs aren't out in force, it's usually their Regs and RMOs that come out. I've seen ALOT of social work involvement with NFR orders though. It's certainlly not something the MO just decides, it's not their choice. Like with any patient treatment, the MO can only advise not decide w/o pt consent.
 

+Po1ntDeXt3r+

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psychs? as in psychiatrist or psychologist?

ummm MO usually sign if the order is consented by patients..

guardians usually have little choice....

NFRs are pretty poor cos like out in the community its far harder if u come to their aid and they arrest... nothin more fun esp if there are ppl there tat think that u can just stop cos they heard the pt saying so..

there is also variability between different hospitals' procedures.
 

vodkacrumble

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White Rabbit said:
Thats ridiculous, of course the pt or the pts family would need to consent to critical orders - if we can't do something as simple as a BSL without consent, how would we get away with letting someone die. Everywhere I've worked, the MO, the family and social work (occasionally pysch) would all be involved, have a conference and ultimatley the family would decide if the pt wasn't legally in a position to consent. It's a grey area , but the pt/guardian def. needs to consent or else you get done for negligence and criminal indifference if he arrests and he dies without an NFR order.

What hospital to do work at? All that I've worked as I see as many social workers as I do physios and OTs. Psychs aren't out in force, it's usually their Regs and RMOs that come out. I've seen ALOT of social work involvement with NFR orders though. It's certainlly not something the MO just decides, it's not their choice. Like with any patient treatment, the MO can only advise not decide w/o pt consent.
dude - chillax and read my post again.

i said i've never seen the the pt/guardian SIGN the order. i never said the don't CONSENT to the order.

i also said i've never seen PSYCHOLOGIST/PSYCHIATRIST involved. the SW part was more that it's rarer to see them involved that just with the MO.

i work at RNSH in St Leonards, if you must know, and i've been here for 2 years (0.5 in admin and 1.5 in nursing).
 

White Rabbit

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Fair enough, i read it as pt has no say and the MO decides all. Family/legal guardian consent if pt isn't able to - legally I mean. I've seen pysch involved alot, but more involved with the family + berevment after NFR is decided. But also for the pt, making sure they understand their choice etc. SW I've seen them involved in the majoirty of NFRs i've seen, and I've worked at a fair few hospitals.

The pt may not sign the actual order, but they do sign consent somewhere, and their wish to be NFR
 

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