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Advanced science or B science? Advice greatly appreciated! (1 Viewer)

Sombreteen

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Hey guys, I just found out that I received an early offer into MQ. My initial goal was to do a bachelor of Science at UNSW because I’m interested in science and expect an atar of ~85. That said, after receiving an early offer into MQ I’ve put in my preference as Advanced Science at MQ because the cutoff is much higher and I know that I’ll onlt get this opportunity through the SRS scheme. Although I’m guaranteed a spot doing adv sci, I’m unsure whether I’m making the right decision. From what I’ve learnt, doing advanced science would mean that I get more internship opportunities in research labs and get to have personal interaction with researchers and post grads and I find this very appealing.. but I worry that I’m biting off more than I can chew doing advanced. What if I decide that I don’t want to get into research and just want to have a stable paying job using my science background? I feel as if advanced science is tailored specifically to research and I’m concerned about job prospects. That said, I really am interested in science and I think I do have quite the aptitude for it. I just want to make the right decision.

Any advice or recommendations would be incredibly helpful, especially if you’re a student a MQ studying either BS or advanced. Also, for anyone studying advanced science, what are the main differences between advanced and just a BS? Will it make that much difference? Thanks :)
 

sida1049

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Do advanced.

For most universities, the difference between advanced and mainstream courses include the following:

- More advanced topics are taught in advanced courses, which mainstream students won't touch at all during the duration of their degree.

- Advanced courses prepare students for honours. For example, I study advanced mathematics at USYD. It's very difficult for me to imagine any mainstream maths/stats majors being able to undertake an honours year in maths/stats, especially since some of the advanced courses are prerequisites. For 1.5 years I also studied economics at the advanced level, and the level of rigour was much higher as well, and specifically tailored to students seeking to complete an honours year.

- Smaller classes. This means 1. you'll be studying alongside other very dedicated students and motivated with similar interests, and 2. your lecturers and academics will very likely be much better acquainted with you.

- More challenging. For many students, this is a good thing, as you get used to the habit of getting things done and not afraid to take up challenges that will reward you. You'll thank yourself later if you put your foot down now and put in some real work.

- More internship opportunities with the industry or with the university (e.g. summer research scholarships). Trying to compete against advanced students for these opportunities while studying at a mainstream level is extremely difficult.
 
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Do advanced.

For most universities, the difference between advanced and mainstream courses include the following:

- More advanced topics are taught in advanced courses, which mainstream students won't touch at all during the duration of their degree.

- Smaller classes. This means 1. you'll be studying alongside other very dedicated students and motivated with similar interests, and 2. your lecturers and academics will very likely be much better acquainted with you.
^ good objective observations.

If you do feel yourself sinking in Adv classes, you have the HECs date and then the Academic penalty date to decide whether to drop. If capitalism has treated you kindly try sticking it out till the academic date to give yourself the best chance of evaluating your situation. Your experience will also depend on your choice of major, of course. Some lecturers truly suck the joy out of a topic and others convey the thrill and excitement of niche areas of science.

However, you won't be disadvantaged going mainstream Bsc if you're a high performing student either. You will still be whacked on the head with "advanced" topics (in passing) when you do 3rd year subjects. You'll still have access to research scholarships etc.
 

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