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an object's colour dependent on its absorbtion (1 Viewer)

kawaiipotato

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If an object has almost 100% absorption within the red light wavelength range, and 0% within the green light wavelength range, would we predict the object to have a red colour or a green colour?
 

InteGrand

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If an object has almost 100% absorption within the red light wavelength range, and 0% within the green light wavelength range, would we predict the object to have a red colour or a green colour?
Green. Colour is based on reflection, not absorption. If it is absorbed, it means that we won't see this colour from the object, as it cannot reach our eyes (as it is absorbed).

''When visible light strikes an object and a specific frequency becomes absorbed, that frequency of light will never make it to our eyes. Any visible light that strikes the object and becomes reflected or transmitted to our eyes will contribute to the color appearance of that object.'' – http://www.physicsclassroom.com/class/light/Lesson-2/Light-Absorption,-Reflection,-and-Transmission
 

kawaiipotato

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Green. Colour is based on reflection, not absorption. If it is absorbed, it means that we won't see this colour from the object, as it cannot reach our eyes (as it is absorbed).

''When visible light strikes an object and a specific frequency becomes absorbed, that frequency of light will never make it to our eyes. Any visible light that strikes the object and becomes reflected or transmitted to our eyes will contribute to the color appearance of that object.'' – http://www.physicsclassroom.com/class/light/Lesson-2/Light-Absorption,-Reflection,-and-Transmission
How about if instead of the absorption graph, it was replaced with an emission spectrum graph?
 

InteGrand

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How about if instead of the absorption graph, it was replaced with an emission spectrum graph?
Well if an object (say a light bulb) is emitting only red light and no green light, then clearly it will look red and not green, since only red light can reach our eyes, and no green light.
 

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