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Can someone please explain the standard model of matter? (1 Viewer)

xxxzxc

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basically the fundamental particles (a brief explanation would be nice)
and the extent that we need to know this (the theory seems to go on forever..)
and do some particles overlap or are they the same (e.g. under the group fermions - are leptons and quarks and yet hadrons are made up of baryons and mesons which are also made of quarks) ??
 

varun_294

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Basic overview would be the knowing that everything is made up either particles or force carriers. Particles are Leptons (electron,muon, tau, electron neutrino, muon neutrino and tau neutrino) and Quarks (Up, down, charm, strange, top, bottom) which make up Hadrons (Baryon and Mesons). And the force carriers are bosons (Gluons, Weakons, gravitons and photons).
 

FCB

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pretty sure no gravitons have been found =P
 

spatula232

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According to the diagram we got given in class, a meson comes under the hadrons, which is under the branch of fermions. Yet a fermion has half-integer spin, whereas mesons have 0 or whole integer spin. How then can a meson be a fermion? According to hyper physics (which I read briefly), a meson is a boson. Isn't a boson a force particle? WTF is going on
 

will_hill98

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Your information seems a tad misguided. I'll do my best to simplify this for you.
So at the core of the standard model is that each fundamental particle is just that - fundamental. So the force-carriers, the bosons, are indivisible particles. Photons, gravitons, and the W, Z and Higgs bosons all are fundamental particles, and indivisible.

On the contrary, hadrons, mesons and essentially every other particle or combination of matter is a composite baryonic particle composed of varying combinations of quarks (and antiquarks according to the SUSY model).

Mesons, which are combinations of quark-antiquark pairs, are made up (in a nutshell) of two quarks. Because hadrons are made up of 3 quarks, they are more complex particles and thus sit higher on the chain of life, if you will, in regards to the hierarchy of particles and quarks etc.

Hopefully that helps :)
 

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