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DNA and Protein, are they the same? (1 Viewer)

crazylilmonkee

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I was studying last night and got REALLY confused about the DNA replication and Protein synthesis..
so in DNA replication, its the unzipping process in which leads to the identical copies of genes..
and in protein synthesis u have the transciption and translation bit..
but is DNA and Protein the same thing? Cos they both have the different bases and stuff, so I just thought they were the same thing and i got all confused by why there is two different processes.. and argh stressed out
HELP?
 

jims

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ur right that both processes start out the same with the DNA unzipping, but after that theyre completely different.

in DNA replication, an enzyme (probably DNA polymerase) adds nucleotides to both unzipped sides of the DNA so that, eventually, there are 2 copies of the all the DNA at the end.

in protein synthesis, only one side of a segment of DNA is transcribed (the gene and probably by RNA polymerase). this complementry copy of the DNA is called mRNA and is made up of RNA nucleotides (which has uracil rather than thymine as a base). after this, the mRNA moves out of the nucleus and the whole translation thing happens and you end up with a polypetide chain.
 

xiao1985

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inaddition, DNA is deoxyribonucleic acid, while protein is a polypeptide (amino acids) with a definite order
 

mei_ling03

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good question... was a lil stumped there...

DNA is made of the sugar, phosphate and bases. proteins are made of amino acids. the bases are used code for specific amino acids. tRNA translates the codons into amino acids, forming a polypeptide.

DNA provides the genetic information that codes for the reproduction, growth and repair of cells, whereas proteins make up enzymes and structural components of the body, e.g. hair. you could, for example, consider the structure of chromosomes which are comprised of 60% protein spun around a DNA core. so, in essence DNA is the genetic blue print and protein is the functional/structural stuff.
DNA never leaves the nucleus, whereas the RNA (in protein synthesis) moves out of the nucleus and to the ribosomes via the cytoplasm to form proteins.

deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is simply ribonucleic acid with all oxygen removed. ribonucleic acid (RNA), on the other hand, has oxygen. i don't really know the significance of this.. but, it may be useful!
 

amyb

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Every group of three bases, the codon, codes for an amino acid. Hence the DNA becomes translated into an enzyme that promotes a particular reaction in the cell. Each of these reaction causes an effect in the organism, for example, the production of the skin pigment.
The control of protein synthesis by DNA occurs during the normal life of the cell. The growth of a cell includes mitosis and cell anlargement. Structure proteins and functional proteins such as enzymes are made at a faster rate during times of cell enlargement.
 

mei_ling03

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Originally posted by amyb
Every group of three bases, the codon, codes for an amino acid. Hence the DNA becomes translated into an enzyme that promotes a particular reaction in the cell. Each of these reaction causes an effect in the organism, for example, the production of the skin pigment.
The control of protein synthesis by DNA occurs during the normal life of the cell. The growth of a cell includes mitosis and cell anlargement. Structure proteins and functional proteins such as enzymes are made at a faster rate during times of cell enlargement.

eh? are we meant to know this?
 

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