Double Degree Question (1 Viewer)

Husky

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On the UNSW future students degree website, I noticed that for Electrical Engineering there is a standard major degree with the honours (https://www.engineering.unsw.edu.au...uate-degrees/electrical-engineering-honours-0) which is a 4 year degree. However there is also a "double" degree which is a 5 year course and includes the standard degree mentioned above, but with a masters degree as the "double" (https://www.engineering.unsw.edu.au...-electrical-masters-of-engineering-electrical). Is it better to do just the normal degree or is it better to do the degree with an integrated masters? I haven't seen any "reviews" of the latter degree so I'm really unsure on which one is better to take as I'm worried about the quality of the 5 year degree and its masters in comparison to the standard 4 year degree (with the possibility of then doing a 2 year masters course). Thank you.
 

Jes03

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On the UNSW future students degree website, I noticed that for Electrical Engineering there is a standard major degree with the honours (https://www.engineering.unsw.edu.au...uate-degrees/electrical-engineering-honours-0) which is a 4 year degree. However there is also a "double" degree which is a 5 year course and includes the standard degree mentioned above, but with a masters degree as the "double" (https://www.engineering.unsw.edu.au...-electrical-masters-of-engineering-electrical). Is it better to do just the normal degree or is it better to do the degree with an integrated masters? I haven't seen any "reviews" of the latter degree so I'm really unsure on which one is better to take as I'm worried about the quality of the 5 year degree and its masters in comparison to the standard 4 year degree (with the possibility of then doing a 2 year masters course). Thank you.
Hi Husky,
I guess its all about what you are looking for in the future and where you want to end up in life. If you believe doing the integrated program/5 year course will be beneficial, then go for that. However, if you want to begin with the four year degree then do the masters program later, that's fine too.
If the four year course will provide the necessary requirements for your future career and is sufficient, maybe consider just that. But, if the five year course provides additional learning that is of interest, have a look at that too. That's right, its hard to make a judgement without any reviews to give you any feedback about the courses. Also, after having a think yourself, you could also contact the uni directly and explain your situation and what you would like to do in the future. Maybe a career advisor could help provide a more informed decision considering they have been working with students. Hope all goes well!
 

#RoadTo31Atar

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An extra year of uni can have a very high opportunity cost, if your 4 year degree can get you a job then by doing an extra year you're not only spending the money on an extra year of uni + spending a year not full time working which would be like 50-60k assuming your salary starts low. I would weigh the potential benefit of the extra year vs its cost and decide that way e.g will that year be beneficial enough in the long run to outweigh a full time salary + 1 yr experience
 

Duskheaven

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I'm currently doing a mechanical engineering degree duel with chemistry and I'm in my second year. I highly recommend the 4 year degree. Employers want on the job experience, in relation to industry, 4 years + 1 year of experience is worth far more than 5 years of experience. I don't regret doing my 5 year degree at all however as I love both fields. If you really want some more clarification, I'd recommend contacting someone on LinkedIn, especially one with previous volunteer work or who has done student outreach before, and asking for their recommendation. I could try and find someone suitable if you wish. I don't believe an average careers adviser has enough experience to give you a recommendation but perhaps I'm just judging that from my own experience at a school where very few people went to uni. I think it would be a better idea to contact a university for advice. Universities have free career consultations for university students, and many, such as UTS, allow for a free consultation to students intending to go to the university.
 

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