Is it too much to ask for a job/career in arts, social science etc etc that pays good, has very good job growth and highly satisfying? (1 Viewer)

idkkdi

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I feel like I'm not making it clear enough so.. in terms of developing my perspective, I'm talking about resources that I can use to address issues in my life or lets me get into a higher social status and economic status. In terms of addressing issues in my life, perspectives, knowledge or mindsets can be useful because it tells me what should I think and how should I change etc etc. In terms of climbing up into a higher social or economic status.. well, think it like this. Say if I want to become a leader of a nation, it's always better for me to understand the economics, the society, the law, the politics or the history of the nation, by learning them, especially gaining first hand experiences it makes me more suitable to the job.
If you want what you have outlined in this statement, it’s not so much about the job as it is the company. The bigger the company the better the development program may be.

however, that satisfaction thing won’t be achievable.
 

idkkdi

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I'm not overestimating the prospects of comp sci - it's a difficult field that requires logical thinking and constant learning. I can understand saying this like 40 years ago but today technology is literally everywhere and there is so much room for improvement/automation and maintenance of systems. A skilled soft developer will always be in demand and not need to end up in an admin role. Don't mean to be rude but I don't think you know anyone who is working in software development if you think it doesn't have good opportunity and most ppl end up in admin roles.

It is true that creating a startup has OC and is hard but I only used it as an example that if you want to - you can start a successful business without a business degree.

Sure a law degree is great but what is the OC of a law degree? You will spend about double the time in uni/education and have about double the debt. By the time your law degree is done you could have a large salary with a comp sci degree.
Ur still tripping. Comp sci compensation Isn’t as high as what u made it out to be and the work is probably decently menial. This is of course with the exception of a few companies, which frankly don’t hire many people.

In au it’s probably amazon google canva atlassian, but I doubt they hire many graduates.
@Drdusk how do the employment prospects look? Also @Drdusk, how much maths does comp sci require when compared to something like physics?
 

#RoadTo31Atar

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Ur still tripping. Comp sci compensation Isn’t as high as what u made it out to be and the work is probably decently menial. This is of course with the exception of a few companies, which frankly don’t hire many people.

In au it’s probably amazon google canva atlassian, but I doubt they hire many graduates.
@Drdusk how do the employment prospects look? Also @Drdusk, how much maths does comp sci require when compared to something like physics?
From reading this I get the idea that you're just saying stuff without putting any thought into it, you're not providing any reasoning besides your own opinion which isn't backed by anything.
 

idkkdi

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From reading this I get the idea that you're just saying stuff without putting any thought into it, you're not providing any reasoning besides your own opinion which isn't backed by anything.
Have you ever coded before?

also what did u mean when u said high wages? Define it.
 
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#RoadTo31Atar

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Have you ever coded before?

also what did u mean when u said high wages? Define it.
Doesn't make a difference whether I've coded or not because we're not talking about my coding

I would consider 150k a high wage in Australia
 

idkkdi

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Doesn't make a difference whether I've coded or not because we're not talking about my coding

I would consider 150k a high wage in Australia
150k how many years out of undergrad? What would you consider comp sci’s graduate salary?
 

#RoadTo31Atar

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150k how many years out of undergrad? What would you consider comp sci’s graduate salary?
I really don't see what point you're trying to make - Idk how long it would take you to get to 150k and it would depend on your role too because comp sci grads can be more than devs, ppl usually become team leaders and project managers after experience.
 

idkkdi

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Doesn't make a difference whether I've coded or not because we're not talking about my coding

I would consider 150k a high wage in Australia
it does matter whether you've coded or not. then you would understand what I mean by menial work, and I bet people such as @Drdusk would agree. However, menial was perhaps not the right way to say it. Perhaps, tedious is a better way to say it. When working for coding efficiency, you copy and paste from github, use stackoverflow to get questions answered, and then spend your entire damn life fixing bugs.
The people who are actually developing NEW & important stuff, like the automation that you were going on about, constitute a small amount of the people, and frankly at that point, a lot of people are incredibly and perhaps unnaturally smart. They are not close to your average comp sci student.

I really don't see what point you're trying to make - Idk how long it would take you to get to 150k and it would depend on your role too because comp sci grads can be more than devs, ppl usually become team leaders and project managers after experience.
this is fair, it seems like you have somewhat of a gauge on computer science salaries. I thought you meant high as in 6 figures out of uni, which only applies to google, amazon, atlassian etc.
However, I would not say 150k a long time into your career is so-called "high". Comp sci in Australia is around a rate of 150k for project managers/team leaders unlike the US which caps at a far higher salary. Please don't bring up startups and stock options, I stated "salary". In comparison to quite a few industries, comp sci indeed pays well, but likely has a lower cap than other industries, since Sydney is somewhat underdeveloped as a comp sci region, especially in the more high-tech stuff. The biggest advantage of comp sci as a degree is the ease of job-finding compared to other fields, which you did state, and perhaps thought I was disregarding. However, what you will find, is that the comp sci market in Sydney is in an undersupply of senior dev's and a somewhat oversupply of junior dev's.

Also note that I said a lot of people end up in admin jobs, not the majority. This was to bring up the fact that a lot of people may not be involved in the "exciting" stuff.

My overall point was meant to allude to computer science being slightly glorified with all the automation and AI craze. The majority of this technology is not developed in Australia, and instead most comp sci majors will end up in less exciting roles, albeit using more brainpower than most other industries. Chances of being involved in truly difficult and new projects will depend on the intelligence of an individual a lot of the time, and frankly, in an industry as stacked in brainpower as computer science, it may be hard to stand out. Long-term trajectory wise, there are also quite a few careers in Australia that pay higher than computer science.
However, if you are looking for high employment rates, computer science is a very good option.
Note that I did see that you wrote skilled software developer, but frankly, not everyone has the ability to become one. A truly skilled software developer needs a pretty big brain, and that can't always be obtained through hard work. Given that you really are among the big brain leagues in computer science, you should definitely find success, but at that point we're looking at 1 in 20 odds at the best.
 

SylviaB

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I feel like I'm not making it clear enough so.. in terms of developing my perspective, I'm talking about resources that I can use to address issues in my life or lets me get into a higher social status and economic status. In terms of addressing issues in my life, perspectives, knowledge or mindsets can be useful because it tells me what should I think and how should I change etc etc. In terms of climbing up into a higher social or economic status.. well, think it like this. Say if I want to become a leader of a nation, it's always better for me to understand the economics, the society, the law, the politics or the history of the nation, by learning them, especially gaining first hand experiences it makes me more suitable to the job.
Thankfully you will never lead a nation
 

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I'm very interested in eco and feel like I would enjoy it in uni but that's mostly why I chose to do comp sci instead. Problem I see with economics degrees is that who is actually hiring economists? Especially straight out of uni no experience economists I feel don't have many options.

An example of what I'm talking about is I know an IT company which has around 1000 people and they have 1 economist. How hard would it be to be that one economist who got that job? I think very hard - how many software developers do they have - hundreds and they are hiring devs who have not even finished uni to work full time. I might not know that much about ppl who have economics degrees and where they work but I think that when you consider how little demand there is for economists I personally wouldn't do it as my only option.

Maybe it could be something for a double degree like comp sci/economics or business/economics but I myself would not do business because I think it has a similar problem of not being able to show that you're better than other ppl and over saturation. Also with business you don't really learn how to make anything yourself whereas a soft dev could just write his own program, make a successful company and do whatever he needs without a business degree.
But you don't have to be an Economist even with an economics degree right?
 

#RoadTo31Atar

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it does matter whether you've coded or not. then you would understand what I mean by menial work, and I bet people such as @Drdusk would agree. However, menial was perhaps not the right way to say it. Perhaps, tedious is a better way to say it. When working for coding efficiency, you copy and paste from github, use stackoverflow to get questions answered, and then spend your entire damn life fixing bugs.
The people who are actually developing NEW & important stuff, like the automation that you were going on about, constitute a small amount of the people, and frankly at that point, a lot of people are incredibly and perhaps unnaturally smart. They are not close to your average comp sci student.



this is fair, it seems like you have somewhat of a gauge on computer science salaries. I thought you meant high as in 6 figures out of uni, which only applies to google, amazon, atlassian etc.
However, I would not say 150k a long time into your career is so-called "high". Comp sci in Australia is around a rate of 150k for project managers/team leaders unlike the US which caps at a far higher salary. Please don't bring up startups and stock options, I stated "salary". In comparison to quite a few industries, comp sci indeed pays well, but likely has a lower cap than other industries, since Sydney is somewhat underdeveloped as a comp sci region, especially in the more high-tech stuff. The biggest advantage of comp sci as a degree is the ease of job-finding compared to other fields, which you did state, and perhaps thought I was disregarding. However, what you will find, is that the comp sci market in Sydney is in an undersupply of senior dev's and a somewhat oversupply of junior dev's.

Also note that I said a lot of people end up in admin jobs, not the majority. This was to bring up the fact that a lot of people may not be involved in the "exciting" stuff.

My overall point was meant to allude to computer science being slightly glorified with all the automation and AI craze. The majority of this technology is not developed in Australia, and instead most comp sci majors will end up in less exciting roles, albeit using more brainpower than most other industries. Chances of being involved in truly difficult and new projects will depend on the intelligence of an individual a lot of the time, and frankly, in an industry as stacked in brainpower as computer science, it may be hard to stand out. Long-term trajectory wise, there are also quite a few careers in Australia that pay higher than computer science.
However, if you are looking for high employment rates, computer science is a very good option.
Note that I did see that you wrote skilled software developer, but frankly, not everyone has the ability to become one. A truly skilled software developer needs a pretty big brain, and that can't always be obtained through hard work. Given that you really are among the big brain leagues in computer science, you should definitely find success, but at that point we're looking at 1 in 20 odds at the best.
I actually have begun learning to code but I didn't want to mention it so it doesn't become one of those arguments where somebody tells you that you don't know enough to have an opinion on something. I will be learning to code with a lot more focus once HSC is over and I have more time but for now atar > coding. I know quite a lot about soft dev and what the careers involve from talking to people (mostly my dad) but I have just only 3-4 months ago made up my mind on choosing it in uni.

I agree on the salaries and obv it's great to get a job at Google right out of uni with a 100k salary but that is not possible for everyone so I didn't want to throw those numbers around like it should be expected for everyone.

I'm glad you mentioned that not everyone can do it because that was one of my main points for why it was in demand earlier. One of the reasons I'm going to do comp sci is because I think that I'm suited for it and if I work hard and go to a good uni I can have a solid chance at being a high skilled developer.

Hope this helps you see my side and why I think it's a good option to do comp sci (at least for me) as it is something where a combination of natural inclination and hard work can be very rewarding.
 

seremify007

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At the end of the day it comes down to what you're passionate about. If you can make something of yourself in any field, you can be a leader. The challenge is how many others are in the same boat trying to do the same thing the pie is only so big, even if you manage to grow it.
 

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At the end of the day it comes down to what you're passionate about. If you can make something of yourself in any field, you can be a leader. The challenge is how many others are in the same boat trying to do the same thing the pie is only so big, even if you manage to grow it.
Fair enough
 

seremify007

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For what it's worth, I think Comp Sci is a great choice. Worked with people with Comp Sci backgrounds and they bring a very rational and unique perspective to solving challenges even in my line of work (consulting/banking). Even though Commerce (Acct/Fin) provides a lot of the background/concepts, an ability to analyse process/data/information flows (or to even come up with them based on talking to people and/or reading BRDs) and then identify logic gaps/flaws in the process, is probably not the strong point of the typical Commerce graduate. With the move to more automation and newer tools for analysis/visualisation like Alteryx, Tableau and PowerBI, there's a much broader skillset than what was traditionally the field of pure Commerce graduates.
 
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D94

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I want money, but I also want other things like job satisfaction or any thing that can lever up my life (such as develop my perspectives)
The grass might be greener on the other side, but when you're in the thick of it, in a well paying job, you simply might not be happy. More money does not lead to better job performance, and poor performance leads to a trapped commitment profile which results in lower job satisfication.

As for actual jobs, search wide. The right job for you probably won't be titled the same as the 200 other similarly titled jobs.
 

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I want money, but I also want other things like job satisfaction or any thing that can lever up my life (such as develop my perspectives)
Job satisfaction is kind of a meme. Work can be fun, but jobs suck. You can enjoy your work, but having to commute and work at a certain time of the day (9-5) with some dorky boss breathing down your neck makes it not fun. Having to ask permission from HR to take annual leave to go on holidays sucks. Doing good work without getting much extra in terms of pay sucks.

Work is tiresome because God made it that way in response to sin. Genesis 3:17-19

Do your best at work, but remember that a job is only a means to an end. Its the rest of your time that matters
 

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