New Syllabus - Scaling (1 Viewer)

_Anonymous

Member
Joined
Jun 30, 2017
Messages
130
Gender
Male
HSC
2019
Considering the new syllabus for Science and English have become considerably harder than the old syllabus, does this mean that Physics, Chemistry, Bio and English will generally get scaled higher compared to before? Or does it depend more on how everyone does in the 2019 HSC?
 

Trebla

Administrator
Administrator
Joined
Feb 16, 2005
Messages
6,579
Gender
Male
HSC
2006
Scaling is all relative (i.e. based on where you rank in the cohort). It has nothing to do with the difficulty of a course.
 

fan96

617 pages
Joined
May 25, 2017
Messages
519
Location
NSW
Gender
Male
HSC
2018
Uni Grad
2024
Might be nice reading:

https://www.uac.edu.au/assets/documents/scaling-reports/Scaling-Report-2017-NSW-HSC.pdf

The model underpinning the scaling algorithm specifies that the scaled mean in a course is
equal to the average academic achievement of the course candidature where, for individual
students, the measure of academic achievement is taken as the average scaled mark in all
courses completed.
i.e. the scaling of a subject is determined by how well its participants perform in other subjects (after scaling).
 

sida1049

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 18, 2013
Messages
950
Gender
Male
HSC
2015
Might be nice reading:

https://www.uac.edu.au/assets/documents/scaling-reports/Scaling-Report-2017-NSW-HSC.pdf



i.e. the scaling of a subject is determined by how well its participants perform in other subjects (after scaling).
I'm not sure how accurate your summary is, since it's a circular statement: i.e. "the scaling of a subject is determined by the average scaled mark of students in all courses, including that subject itself." So in regards to the "scaled mean in a course", it's not a parameter that determines the scaling procedure, but rather a summary statistic as a result of the scaling procedure.

lmao wtf every photo in that report is from my high school

damn, my school looks better than how I remember it
 

Trebla

Administrator
Administrator
Joined
Feb 16, 2005
Messages
6,579
Gender
Male
HSC
2006
The distribution of marks in English (as it is the only compulsory subject so it has just about every student in the state) is used as the common scale which forms the baseline for scaling.

Let's suppose the statewide average raw mark (not the realigned HSC mark you see on your certificate) is 50% for English.

Of that entire English cohort, there would be some that also did say Chemistry. Let's suppose the average raw mark of those Chemistry students in English was 60%, which is higher than the statewide average of 50%. This suggests that there are stronger students doing Chemistry on average. Therefore, the marks in the Chemistry subject would be 'scaled up' so to speak to reflect this 'skewed' distribution.

However, if the average raw mark of these Chemistry students in English was say 40% instead then this suggests that there are weaker students doing Chemistry on average. Therefore, the marks would be 'scaled down' to reflect it skewing the other way.

This is a simplified version of how scaling works. Hopefully it makes sense and you can see why the difficulty of a course does not directly impact how it is scaled.
 
Last edited:

fan96

617 pages
Joined
May 25, 2017
Messages
519
Location
NSW
Gender
Male
HSC
2018
Uni Grad
2024
I'm not sure how accurate your summary is, since it's a circular statement: i.e. "the scaling of a subject is determined by the average scaled mark of students in all courses, including that subject itself." So in regards to the "scaled mean in a course", it's not a parameter that determines the scaling procedure, but rather a summary statistic as a result of the scaling procedure.

lmao wtf every photo in that report is from my high school

damn, my school looks better than how I remember it

The report goes on to say that a set of simultaneous equations are created and solved.

That sounds reasonable enough to me.

For example if there were two subjects then there would be two equations for their scaled means each with two unknowns, so a unique solution would exist.
 

sida1049

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 18, 2013
Messages
950
Gender
Male
HSC
2015
The report goes on to say that a set of simultaneous equations are created and solved.

That sounds reasonable enough to me.

For example if there were two subjects then there would be two equations for their scaled means each with two unknowns, so a unique solution would exist.
Yeah that's fine, I have no quarrels with the official report itself; it was just that your previous summary of a particular section was worded inaccurately
 

frog0101

Member
Joined
Mar 26, 2016
Messages
32
Gender
Male
HSC
N/A
New Syllabus Scaling

Hi,
Due to the change in syllabus, and each subject content being majorly different (at least in the sciences), do you think that the scaling of subjects will change?
 

asher32

New Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2018
Messages
6
Gender
Male
HSC
2019
Re: New Syllabus Scaling

I mean, it is difficult to assess the scaling given that the first year of the new syllabus hasn't happened yet but I would assume that given the new science syllabi are considerably harder, it could scale a bit better.
 

Trebla

Administrator
Administrator
Joined
Feb 16, 2005
Messages
6,579
Gender
Male
HSC
2006
Re: New Syllabus Scaling

Scaling is dependent on relative cohort performance, not difficulty of the subject.
 

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Users: 0, Guests: 1)

Top