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Occupational Therapy - Info package :) (1 Viewer)

madharris

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Hi again

I was just wondering whether you would think it's a good idea to do a biology bridging course before going into this course... In terms of science, I only do Chemistry at school...

Thanks!
I'd say that if you have time in the summer and have the money to do it then go ahead, because no amount of bio knowledge can ever harm your learning. However it's not essential, it will probably just help you to understand some concepts a bit faster in your science subjects

There are many people in the course that didn't do bio or any science at all during school and seem to be coping fine but it's up to you.

Sent from my GT-I9300 using Tapatalk
 

reneryK

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Hi

I hope you're going well with your studies.

Thank you for this info package you've put together! It was so helpful in my decision to put OT as my first preference. I was in a similar position as you, no idea what OT was until I've looked and researched the profession. I know I wanted to work in the healthcare industry but I don't want to go into medicine or even nursing.

I'm currently doing B Health Science at Usyd so the info you gave were relevant. I was interested in either OT or Speech, and I'm a mature-aged student as well, but I have no previous undergrad degree so the pressure to make a decision was ON!

Luckily, I got an offer for OT at Usyd! Thank God! It was a "make or break" for me this year. If I didn't get the offer, I would push through with BHS and try my luck with OT masters.

Anyways, just wanted to ask a few questions if you don't mind:
1. Do you know anyone who have done BHS in their first year and applied for credit for first yr units (for the non-OT electives) and was successful?
I have done psychology and health sociology units in BHS yr1 and it looks very similar to the stuff covered in HSBH1003 Health Behaviour and Society.

2. Did you had to do FMA B as an elective? Apparently it is recommended as a non-OT elective. Just looking at the core FMA A that I have to do in Sem 1 terrifies me already!

3. Has anyone did a reduced load, like 3 units per semester (for their first 2 years of the program)?
I know it will take longer to finish, but I have a part-time job that will be hard to quit coz it pays the bills and I have a family to support (30hpw, 3 nights pwk some weekday and weekends)

Either reply here, pm me or email me on kc.ramos@me.com

I haven't got any response from the faculty about my first two questions so I thought I'd ask you if you have any idea. Anyway, any info from you would be very much appreciated. I might ring them today if my call would get in!

Thanks again. All the best
 

madharris

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Congratz on your offer :)

I know quite a few people who have transferred from 1st/2nd year BHS, going off their experiences:
- You don't have to do HSBH1003
- You don't have to do the biomedical science elective
- You don't have to do the behavioural/social science elective
- You don't have to do the third elective
- If you want you can get credit for your 3 electives you do in 4th year (whether they're OT electives or not OT electives)

I've done FMB as an elective. I'm not sure who recommended it as a non-OT elective but 90% of people don't do it, if that helps you make your decision whether or not to do it. It's useful, but at the same time once you've done the basics in FMA you can learn it all yourself.
- FMA isn't as horrible as people say it is don't worry :)

Yeah there are people with a reduced case load in the first 2 years - however in 2nd year 1st sem, you'll have to do 4 subjects unless you can move your subjects around.

Yeah there are quite a few people who have done 3 units per semester in the first 2 years of the course

If you want further information, this person is probably your best contact in terms of applying for credit and rearranging your timetable (if you wanted to).
http://sydney.edu.au/health-sciences/staff/anne_honey
 

reneryK

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Thanks! I'll drop her an email.

Last query though, how are your placements going? I guess we dont have a choice where we do placements, just like other health degrees, but is it likely that they'll put some students really far from where they live? Did u had to travel far for placements?

I guess I wanted to know your experience, like, how early u made bookings for accomodations (if needed), which places u have done your placements, how early did they release the info on where ur placement is? Those sort of info...Just so i can have an idea how to prepare myself and my family when i start doing placements.

Thanks again [emoji1]
 

madharris

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Thanks! I'll drop her an email.

Last query though, how are your placements going? I guess we dont have a choice where we do placements, just like other health degrees, but is it likely that they'll put some students really far from where they live? Did u had to travel far for placements?

I guess I wanted to know your experience, like, how early u made bookings for accomodations (if needed), which places u have done your placements, how early did they release the info on where ur placement is? Those sort of info...Just so i can have an idea how to prepare myself and my family when i start doing placements.

Thanks again [emoji1]
My placements are great, they're the best part of the degree :)
You get to preference places in 3rd and 4th year but you don't have a choice in 1st and 2nd year.

My furthest placement so far has been in Bulli (which is near wollongong) and I just stayed with a friend, however some people have had to trek it out as far as broken hill. They usually release 1st/2nd year placements a month beforehand which is plenty of time to find accommodation and prepare if needed. For 3rd and 4th year placements, they give you a bit more notice. I've done placement in a physical rehab hospital, a service providing physical community OT and a community mental health clubhouse. These were in the North Shore, Northern Beaches and Wollongong areas.

If you're unable/don't want to do a rural/out of sydney placement because of your family (you might have kids, i'm not sure) then you can just fill in a form and not have to do it (although they're pretty strict on the criteria so you will need to double check).
 

reneryK

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Thanks! These are helpful info!

Actually I do have kids, and I wouldn't mind going rural as well (I would love to try it out), but obviously with my current commitments I do need to make sure I have enough info so I can prepare what needs to be prepared. Hopefully they'll just send me rural on my first 2 years lol

Again, thank u so much for the above info! I cant wait to start!

Good luck on your journey with OT as well!
 

madharris

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I love it :) I'm in my third year and am currently in Dubbo for my 4th placement and it's pretty amazing despite being 5.5hours from sydney.

I wouldn't do anything else at uni :)
 

Schmeag

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I love it :) I'm in my third year and am currently in Dubbo for my 4th placement and it's pretty amazing despite being 5.5hours from sydney.

I wouldn't do anything else at uni :)
OTs fulfil a function of allied health that many other health professions including medical/nursing don't cover. For geriatrics and rehabilitation (and I am sure in other fields), OTs provide a driving influence for multi-disciplinary teams in deciding the pathways and goals of inpatient rehabilitation. All the individual OTs I have met have been great people, so thanks for existing!
 

sandhii

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Hi!!!
Thanks for all of this and this has really helped. Definitely so grateful ������������������������
You have no idea how much of a help you have been!!!
So sorry for being annoying but I have some questions if you don't mind answering.
1. In terms of workload how many hours would you have to study and work a week?
2. Do you have any examples of how an assignment can be confusing or difficult?
3. examples of an assessment task in general?
4. Is the job as an occupational therapist stressful? Well just from ur observations when you've been on placement at least because what if you're always really busy and you have to see many patients and do lots of administrative work on top of that?
5. I also don't like sitting much so how much paperwork, computer usage, sitting is there when you're studying in uni and when you become an occupational therapist? Or how much you think there will be for occupational therapists.
6. For the lectures/tutorials etc. do you always have to attend? I mean five day a week of school is a lot and I want to get a part time job.
7. How many hours do you have to attend uni a week and if I choose to cram all my hours into two days can I do that instead of studying five hours everyday for five days a week?
8. At usyd is it approximately five hours per week and five days a week?
9. What is the general demographic who studies occupational therapy? Sorry I used to get teased in primary school so I'm kinda paranoid it'll happen in uni. I hope you can answer this question for me.
10. In terms of content how much memorising is there? Especially with anatomy and neuroscience. Are you able to compare them to a subject in high school such as biology or something a high school student can relate to? What about how many pages of content do I need to read and memorise? Compare it to the Hunger Games?Harry potter?
11. Compared to studying for the HSC and prelim in high school is there more workload and is it harder in uni? I know this depends on what subjects I chose for high school but if I choose moderately scaling subjects.

Hope I'm not being too annoying but it would be so awesome if you could answer these questions and thank you so so so so much for all of this!!!!
 
Last edited:

madharris

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Hi!!!
Thanks for all of this and this has really helped. Definitely so grateful ������������������������
You have no idea how much of a help you have been!!!
So sorry for being annoying but I have some questions if you don't mind answering.


Hope I'm not being too annoying but it would be so awesome if you could answer these questions and thank you so so so so much for all of this!!!!
1. In terms of workload how many hours would you have to study and work a week?
- It's like 12-16 contact hours a week, it's not too many :)
Studying depends on yourself. I make myself an assessment timetable at the beginning of each semester (when everything is due) and base my studying/work around that. It's really up to you how you want to approach it though.

2. Do you have any examples of how an assignment can be confusing or difficult?
3. examples of an assessment task in general?
OT isn't so straight forward sometimes. It's a lot of evidence based practice, and there's always new research coming out.
You have to think of the person themself, their environment, their occupation/what they need/want to do, and how these fit all together to optimise their performance at something. We don't heal people like doctors, but we help people to do the things as independently as possible.

A lot of our assessments are case studies. So say for example you have a child with cerebral palsy who is starting school next year. What are the barriers to the child participating in the physical and social aspect of school life and what can you do about it. A lot of the assessments are based on things that you could be doing in the real world when you graduate, so the majority of them are really interesting :)

4. Is the job as an occupational therapist stressful? Well just from ur observations when you've been on placement at least because what if you're always really busy and you have to see many patients and do lots of administrative work on top of that?
It really depends on the type of job you have. You could be working in an acute ward where there is a high turnover rate and seeing 15 patients a day, trying to discharge them as fast as possible. Or you could be working in a community mental health centre where it may be pretty chilled in comparison. Every job is different and every day is different :) After you see each patient/client/consumer (in most settings) you will need to document, for legal reasons and just as a form of communication. So there is a bit of admin work but you find ways of fitting it in.

5. I also don't like sitting much so how much paperwork, computer usage, sitting is there when you're studying in uni and when you become an occupational therapist? Or how much you think there will be for occupational therapists.
At uni: For almost every degree, you will have to study, meaning there will be quite a bit of paper work, computer usage, etc.
As I said before, OT is about evidence based practice, the best OT's constantly review the literature and find new ways to do things. You're also not going to know everything about every diagnosis and disease, or even about peoples cultures and contexts, etc. You will always be doing prep work and googling to gain a better understanding of how you can help someone, as everybody is different. E.g. Two people with a broken arm in exactly the same spot could come from different socioeconomic backgrounds, have different friendship groups, have different needs and wants, different jobs, different attitudes, etc, all which we need to take into consideration when we are working with someone. Paperwork and stuff also really depends on what type of job you get as an OT as well. (There are hundreds of different kinds of OT's)

6. For the lectures/tutorials etc. do you always have to attend? I mean five day a week of school is a lot and I want to get a part time job.
7. How many hours do you have to attend uni a week and if I choose to cram all my hours into two days can I do that instead of studying five hours everyday for five days a week?
8. At usyd is it approximately five hours per week and five days a week?
In the undergrad program at usyd, there is about 80-100 people in first year. It doesn't really leave a lot of room for different classes and stuff as it's not feasible. In saying that though i've never had a 5 day week, it's usually about 3. You don't have to attend any lectures (although it is encouraged that you do go). Tutes/prac attendance is usually 80% (however will vary depending on the unit). Also, I have 3 jobs :p You'll be fine :)

9. What is the general demographic who studies occupational therapy? Sorry I used to get teased in primary school so I'm kinda paranoid it'll happen in uni. I hope you can answer this question for me.
Ummm it's like 70%/80% girls. Maybe 30% asian, 60% white, 10% other? Uni is a lot different from school :) You shouldn't let demographics get in the way of doing what you want to do!

10. In terms of content how much memorising is there? Especially with anatomy and neuroscience. Are you able to compare them to a subject in high school such as biology or something a high school student can relate to? What about how many pages of content do I need to read and memorise? Compare it to the Hunger Games?Harry potter?
OT subjects: 5% memorisation
With science subjects you will both need to memorise and understand the content. If I was to compare it to a school subject (that I did), it would probably be year 11 chemistry. In year 11 chem (from memory), you were required to know the content but also know how to apply it, memorising alone isn't enough. The pages of content depends on the length of your notes.

11. Compared to studying for the HSC and prelim in high school is there more workload and is it harder in uni? I know this depends on what subjects I chose for high school but if I choose moderately scaling subjects.
It's definitely harder than high school (in my opinion), you have to keep ontop of things, and they go quite fast through the content. In high school, I did a lot of rote learning, however in uni this doesn't really work. You will find your own way of studying effectively (or maybe you already have), you'll find out what works in terms of studying and what doesn't :)

Let me know if you need me to clarify anything or if you have any more questions :)
 
Last edited:

sandhii

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1. In terms of workload how many hours would you have to study and work a week?
- It's like 12-16 contact hours a week, it's not too many :)
Studying depends on yourself. I make myself an assessment timetable at the beginning of each semester (when everything is due) and base my studying/work around that. It's really up to you how you want to approach it though.

2. Do you have any examples of how an assignment can be confusing or difficult?
3. examples of an assessment task in general?
OT isn't so straight forward sometimes. It's a low of evidence based practice, and there's always new research coming out.
You have to think of the person themself, their environment, their occupation/what they need/want to do, and how these fit all together to optimise their performance at something. We don't heal people like doctors, but we help people to do the things as independently as possible.

A lot of our assessments are case studies. So say for example you have a child with cerebral palsy who is starting school next year. What are the barriers to the child participating in the physical and social aspect of school life and what can you do about it. A lot of the assessments are based on things that you could be doing in the real world when you graduate, so the majority of them are really interesting :)

4. Is the job as an occupational therapist stressful? Well just from ur observations when you've been on placement at least because what if you're always really busy and you have to see many patients and do lots of administrative work on top of that?
It really depends on the type of job you have. You could be working in an acute ward where there is a high turnover rate and seeing 15 patients a day, trying to discharge them as fast as possible. Or you could be working in a community mental health centre where it may be pretty chilled in comparison. Every job is different and every day is different :) After you see each patient/client/consumer (in most settings) you will need to document, for legal reasons and just as a form of communication. So there is a bit of admin work but you find ways of fitting it in.

5. I also don't like sitting much so how much paperwork, computer usage, sitting is there when you're studying in uni and when you become an occupational therapist? Or how much you think there will be for occupational therapists.
At uni: For almost every degree, you will have to study, meaning there will be quite a bit of paper work, computer usage, etc.
As I said before, OT is about evidence based practice, the best OT's constantly review the literature and find new ways to do things. You're also not going to know everything about every diagnosis and disease, or even about peoples cultures and contexts, etc. You will always be doing prep work and googling to gain a better understanding of how you can help someone, as everybody is different. E.g. Two people with a broken arm in exactly the same spot could come from different socioeconomic backgrounds, have different friendship groups, have different needs and wants, different jobs, different attitudes, etc, all which we need to take into consideration when we are working with someone. Paperwork and stuff also really depends on what type of job you get as an OT as well. (There are hundreds of different kinds of OT's)

6. For the lectures/tutorials etc. do you always have to attend? I mean five day a week of school is a lot and I want to get a part time job.
7. How many hours do you have to attend uni a week and if I choose to cram all my hours into two days can I do that instead of studying five hours everyday for five days a week?
8. At usyd is it approximately five hours per week and five days a week?
In the undergrad program at usyd, there is about 80-100 people in first year. It doesn't really leave a lot of room for different classes and stuff as it's not feasible. In saying that though i've never had a 5 day week, it's usually about 3. You don't have to attend any lectures (although it is encouraged that you do go). Tutes/prac attendance is usually 80% (however will vary depending on the unit). Also, I have 3 jobs :p You'll be fine :)

9. What is the general demographic who studies occupational therapy? Sorry I used to get teased in primary school so I'm kinda paranoid it'll happen in uni. I hope you can answer this question for me.
Ummm it's like 70%/80% girls. Maybe 30% asian, 60% white, 10% other? Uni is a lot different from school :) You shouldn't let demographics get in the way of doing what you want to do!

10. In terms of content how much memorising is there? Especially with anatomy and neuroscience. Are you able to compare them to a subject in high school such as biology or something a high school student can relate to? What about how many pages of content do I need to read and memorise? Compare it to the Hunger Games?Harry potter?
OT subjects: 5% memorisation
With science subjects you will both need to memorise and understand the content. If I was to compare it to a school subject (that I did), it would probably be year 11 chemistry. In year 11 chem (from memory), you were required to know the content but also know how to apply it, memorising alone isn't enough. The pages of content depends on the length of your notes.

11. Compared to studying for the HSC and prelim in high school is there more workload and is it harder in uni? I know this depends on what subjects I chose for high school but if I choose moderately scaling subjects.
It's definitely harder than high school (in my opinion), you have to keep ontop of things, and they go quite fast through the content. In high school, I did a lot of rote learning, however in uni this doesn't really work. You will find your own way of studying effectively (or maybe you already have), you'll find out what works in terms of studying and what doesn't :)

Let me know if you need me to clarify anything or if you have any more questions :)
Thank you so much for answering!!! Right now I have no questions but thanks so much for reading and replying so quickly!
:) :) :)
 

sandhii

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I
1. In terms of workload how many hours would you have to study and work a week?
- It's like 12-16 contact hours a week, it's not too many :)
Studying depends on yourself. I make myself an assessment timetable at the beginning of each semester (when everything is due) and base my studying/work around that. It's really up to you how you want to approach it though.

2. Do you have any examples of how an assignment can be confusing or difficult?
3. examples of an assessment task in general?
OT isn't so straight forward sometimes. It's a low of evidence based practice, and there's always new research coming out.
You have to think of the person themself, their environment, their occupation/what they need/want to do, and how these fit all together to optimise their performance at something. We don't heal people like doctors, but we help people to do the things as independently as possible.

A lot of our assessments are case studies. So say for example you have a child with cerebral palsy who is starting school next year. What are the barriers to the child participating in the physical and social aspect of school life and what can you do about it. A lot of the assessments are based on things that you could be doing in the real world when you graduate, so the majority of them are really interesting :)

4. Is the job as an occupational therapist stressful? Well just from ur observations when you've been on placement at least because what if you're always really busy and you have to see many patients and do lots of administrative work on top of that?
It really depends on the type of job you have. You could be working in an acute ward where there is a high turnover rate and seeing 15 patients a day, trying to discharge them as fast as possible. Or you could be working in a community mental health centre where it may be pretty chilled in comparison. Every job is different and every day is different :) After you see each patient/client/consumer (in most settings) you will need to document, for legal reasons and just as a form of communication. So there is a bit of admin work but you find ways of fitting it in.

5. I also don't like sitting much so how much paperwork, computer usage, sitting is there when you're studying in uni and when you become an occupational therapist? Or how much you think there will be for occupational therapists.
At uni: For almost every degree, you will have to study, meaning there will be quite a bit of paper work, computer usage, etc.
As I said before, OT is about evidence based practice, the best OT's constantly review the literature and find new ways to do things. You're also not going to know everything about every diagnosis and disease, or even about peoples cultures and contexts, etc. You will always be doing prep work and googling to gain a better understanding of how you can help someone, as everybody is different. E.g. Two people with a broken arm in exactly the same spot could come from different socioeconomic backgrounds, have different friendship groups, have different needs and wants, different jobs, different attitudes, etc, all which we need to take into consideration when we are working with someone. Paperwork and stuff also really depends on what type of job you get as an OT as well. (There are hundreds of different kinds of OT's)

6. For the lectures/tutorials etc. do you always have to attend? I mean five day a week of school is a lot and I want to get a part time job.
7. How many hours do you have to attend uni a week and if I choose to cram all my hours into two days can I do that instead of studying five hours everyday for five days a week?
8. At usyd is it approximately five hours per week and five days a week?
In the undergrad program at usyd, there is about 80-100 people in first year. It doesn't really leave a lot of room for different classes and stuff as it's not feasible. In saying that though i've never had a 5 day week, it's usually about 3. You don't have to attend any lectures (although it is encouraged that you do go). Tutes/prac attendance is usually 80% (however will vary depending on the unit). Also, I have 3 jobs :p You'll be fine :)

9. What is the general demographic who studies occupational therapy? Sorry I used to get teased in primary school so I'm kinda paranoid it'll happen in uni. I hope you can answer this question for me.
Ummm it's like 70%/80% girls. Maybe 30% asian, 60% white, 10% other? Uni is a lot different from school :) You shouldn't let demographics get in the way of doing what you want to do!

10. In terms of content how much memorising is there? Especially with anatomy and neuroscience. Are you able to compare them to a subject in high school such as biology or something a high school student can relate to? What about how many pages of content do I need to read and memorise? Compare it to the Hunger Games?Harry potter?
OT subjects: 5% memorisation
With science subjects you will both need to memorise and understand the content. If I was to compare it to a school subject (that I did), it would probably be year 11 chemistry. In year 11 chem (from memory), you were required to know the content but also know how to apply it, memorising alone isn't enough. The pages of content depends on the length of your notes.

11. Compared to studying for the HSC and prelim in high school is there more workload and is it harder in uni? I know this depends on what subjects I chose for high school but if I choose moderately scaling subjects.
It's definitely harder than high school (in my opinion), you have to keep ontop of things, and they go quite fast through the content. In high school, I did a lot of rote learning, however in uni this doesn't really work. You will find your own way of studying effectively (or maybe you already have), you'll find out what works in terms of studying and what doesn't :)

Let me know if you need me to clarify anything or if you have any more questions :)
Thanks so much for answering!! I'm really grateful for your response. Right now I don't have any questions but I'll post if I do!!
Once again thank you for replying!!! :) :)
 

rinity

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Hello!

As someone who just got her HSC results a few days ago and was thinking about which uni + course to go into, I honestly can't thank you enough for posting this thread and helping me decide on OT at USyd ^___^

I hope you don't mind but I have a few questions, hopefully they're not too much of a bother haha:

1. In the event that I wanted to transfer out of OT after 1st year/2nd year/3rd year to do medicine or something, would there be any reason to not allow me to transfer, e.g. doing a reduced case load in the first year? Sorry this seems like such a dumb question HAHA :L
2. How easy is it to get/maintain a high GPA in OT? (again, for transfer reasons)
3. Is there a lot of chemistry in the course? I did chemistry in Year 11 and found it hard/didn't like it so I dropped it in Year 12, but would that make OT hard for me?
4. How many electives are required for each year? Do you have any suggestions for those that are easier than others? (and preferably chem-free LOL)
5. Does OT as a profession, put food on the table? Are there many job opportunities after graduation in comparison to say, diagnostic radiography or physiotherapy?

Thank you in advance!! I am so grateful for this thread and for your patience answering everyone's questions :D
 
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joannaadele

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Thanks so much for the information :) It's super helpful!
I've been thinking of doing OT next year however I have a few questions?

I've been wanting to study Occupational Therapy (Allied Health / Health Sciences) which is offered at USYD, the 2015 cut-off being 93.05, so hopefully I'll receive an offer. However WSU offered my a 20K Scholarship (5K for 4 years) to study there. What do you think I should do?

And also what are the contact hours at USYD?

Thanks so much, hopefully your degree is going well!
 

thortier

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Thank you so much for this info package! It has been extremely helpful.
On the topic of transfers, I'm planning on doing OT at Newcastle and trying for a transfer to USYD as I don't think I'll get into USYD with an atar of 90.4- have there been people who've done external transfers/how difficult is it?
 

madharris

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Hello!

As someone who just got her HSC results a few days ago and was thinking about which uni + course to go into, I honestly can't thank you enough for posting this thread and helping me decide on OT at USyd ^___^

I hope you don't mind but I have a few questions, hopefully they're not too much of a bother haha:

1. In the event that I wanted to transfer out of OT after 1st year/2nd year/3rd year to do medicine or something, would there be any reason to not allow me to transfer, e.g. doing a reduced case load in the first year? Sorry this seems like such a dumb question HAHA :L
2. How easy is it to get/maintain a high GPA in OT? (again, for transfer reasons)
3. Is there a lot of chemistry in the course? I did chemistry in Year 11 and found it hard/didn't like it so I dropped it in Year 12, but would that make OT hard for me?
4. How many electives are required for each year? Do you have any suggestions for those that are easier than others? (and preferably chem-free LOL)
5. Does OT as a profession, put food on the table? Are there many job opportunities after graduation in comparison to say, diagnostic radiography or physiotherapy?

Thank you in advance!! I am so grateful for this thread and for your patience answering everyone's questions :D
1: there's no reduced caseload in first year (unless you choose to take on less units) so it should not impact transfers as far as I'm aware
2: It really depends on a number of factors. There are people with high range distinction averages (maybe even HD averages) and there are people who fail units. Keep in mind for the majority of courses, you will probably just need a credit average which isn't too difficult to maintain
3: naaa not that much chem at all.
4: There's 6 electives all together. You need to do at least 1 bioscience elective which I assume will at least have a little bit of chem. I struggled with year 11 chem too, however the way that they teach it at uni is a lot better than I was taught at school (in my opinion)
5: There's probably more jobs in OT than diagnostic radiography and physio, just because there are so many more areas that you can go into. Physios and OT's will probably earn a similar salary (depending on the area), although i'm not sure about radiographers.


Thanks so much for the information :) It's super helpful!
I've been thinking of doing OT next year however I have a few questions?

I've been wanting to study Occupational Therapy (Allied Health / Health Sciences) which is offered at USYD, the 2015 cut-off being 93.05, so hopefully I'll receive an offer. However WSU offered my a 20K Scholarship (5K for 4 years) to study there. What do you think I should do?

And also what are the contact hours at USYD?

Thanks so much, hopefully your degree is going well!
Contact hours will vary depending on your electives, but I don't think I've ever had more than 15 a week.
As for your decision with WSU vs USyd it really depends on what you want. I don't really know too much about the WSU course so I can't really comment on it. Do a bit of research on other factors that might help influence you such as social activities, travel, campus, etc. Keep note that I think by 2018 or something, cumberland will be integrated into the camperdown/darlington campus. (So half your degree will be at cumbo, other half at main)


Thank you so much for this info package! It has been extremely helpful.
On the topic of transfers, I'm planning on doing OT at Newcastle and trying for a transfer to USYD as I don't think I'll get into USYD with an atar of 90.4- have there been people who've done external transfers/how difficult is it?
I assume you just need a credit average to transfer into OT at usyd, maybe a high credit average to be on the safe side.
It's not too difficult :)
 

Boombam

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Hey, great post!

I'm interested in transferring into OT next year, would anyone know what GPA i would need to transfer to OT at usyd?
My GPA currently is 3.33/4? Would this be sufficient if I keep my GPA around this range?

Thanks!
 

Huanhuan807

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Hi

Thanks for these useful details. ☺☺
I'm an international student who's doing year12 in Sydney and I wanna to do OP in uni. As I acknowledged that OP is not a popular course for international students, so I'm bit worried about the uni studies & the job prospects....(I've read what you wrote up there,but is it the same for international student?) Can you please tell me what's the conditions for international students doing OP course in Sydney Uni, like how many international students are in your class/study group? are they find difficult to study the course (language & understanding issues)?

Thanks very much!!
 
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madharris

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Hey, great post!

I'm interested in transferring into OT next year, would anyone know what GPA i would need to transfer to OT at usyd?
My GPA currently is 3.33/4? Would this be sufficient if I keep my GPA around this range?

Thanks!
There's no guarantees, but I think you should be fine

Hi

Thanks for these useful details. ☺☺������
I'm an international student who's doing year12 in Sydney and I wanna to do OP in uni. As I acknowledged that OP is not a popular course for international students, so I'm bit worried about the uni studies & the job prospects....(I've read what you wrote up there,but is it the same for international student?) Can you please tell me what's the conditions for international students doing OP course in Sydney Uni, like how many international students are in your class/study group? are they find difficult to study the course (language & understanding issues)?

Thanks very much!!������������
There's quite a few international students in my course. I don't really want to comment too much on the requirements/conditions for international students just because I'm not too familiar with them. The assignments that you'll get are pretty 'wordy' in that there'll be reports, essays, practicals, etc and your English will need to be quite good. Some international students in the course have struggled from the result of what I assume to be a language barrier, however I can't be 100% sure.

As for job prospects, as long as you're competent and know what you're doing, then there's no reason why you should be favoured any less in the job application process.

If you're concerned, then whatever uni you choose to go to there should be some support for international students. They will probably be able to answer your questions better than I can. http://sydney.edu.au/study/admissions/international-students-why-choose-sydney.html

hope that helps :)
 

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