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Pauli's Contribution to the Atomic Theory? (1 Viewer)

m_wahwah

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One of the dot points tells us to assess Pauli's contribution to the development of the atomic theory. I've read over a few sets of notes and they all speak about the same things - the Exclusion Principle; how two electrons cant have the same set of quantum numbers, etcetc. For some reason I don't get what any of that means, or how it contributes to the atomic theory at all. Can someone help out by explaining it in more simple terms, so I can understand exactly what he did? Thanks
 

mrpotatoed

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The exclusion principle explains what causes the limitations of the bohr model

Eg: quantum number having to be different causes sub shells and hence fine line structure... or something to that effect
 

duhdevitt

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So similar to what mrpotato said, Pauli stated the exclusion principle which basically that no two electrons can have the same quantum properties. This includes spin(not necessary to know but will show the marker you know your shit aha). Now remember most of quanta goes back to bohrs limitation and one of em was that some spectral lines were brighter than others and if each electron have different properties , in a way that explains it. So his main contribution was associated with Bohr, PM me if you need anymore help

Best of luck man
 

mrpotatoed

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So similar to what mrpotato said, Pauli stated the exclusion principle which basically that no two electrons can have the same quantum properties. This includes spin(not necessary to know but will show the marker you know your shit aha). Now remember most of quanta goes back to bohrs limitation and one of em was that some spectral lines were brighter than others and if each electron have different properties , in a way that explains it. So his main contribution was associated with Bohr, PM me if you need anymore help

Best of luck man
From my understanding, the exclusion principle does not explain the relative intensity of spectral lines, since the relative intensity is to do with some electron transitions being preferred over another. This is do with probability and I think somewhat relates to Heisenberg's uncertainty principle and some other stuff that is not in the HSC syllabus... but yeah... correct me if I am wrong.
 

duhdevitt

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From my understanding, the exclusion principle does not explain the relative intensity of spectral lines, since the relative intensity is to do with some electron transitions being preferred over another. This is do with probability and I think somewhat relates to Heisenberg's uncertainty principle and some other stuff that is not in the HSC syllabus... but yeah... correct me if I am wrong.
In a way it does, I mention it and the teacher don't mind but you can choose to use it or not use it. It's not a must, just the basic idea
 

MaccaFacta

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The Exclusion Principle was the thing he got a Nobel Prize for, but he also came up with the idea of the neutrino i.e. during beta decay, a very tiny neutral particle was emitted - which explained why a beta ray can have a range of energies (e.g. when Carbon 14 decays into Nitrogen 14) - and not a single sharp peak of energy like alpha radiation (e.g. when Uranium 238 decays into Thorium 234).
 

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