Thoughts on Project Management combined with Civil Engineering? (1 Viewer)

_Anonymous

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As title states, what are your thoughts on Civil/Project Management as a double-degree? Does it actually help later on in becoming a project manager? I'm assuming after the degree you'd need to be working as a regular civil engineer for a minimum of 5 years until you can actually become a project manager, but would having the add-on of a project management degree increase the likelihood of becoming an engineering project manager?
 

Drdusk

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As title states, what are your thoughts on Civil/Project Management as a double-degree? Does it actually help later on in becoming a project manager? I'm assuming after the degree you'd need to be working as a regular civil engineer for a minimum of 5 years until you can actually become a project manager, but would having the add-on of a project management degree increase the likelihood of becoming an engineering project manager?
Probably because it shows you have the skills needed. However I would say they would consider other factors such as how well you actually worked in a lower level job as much or even more than that degree.
 

_Anonymous

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Probably because it shows you have the skills needed. However I would say they would consider other factors such as how well you actually worked in a lower level job as much or even more than that degree.
Do you think a Masters in Engineering would be more beneficial over a Masters in Project Management in terms of further study?
 

Drdusk

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Do you think a Masters in Engineering would be more beneficial over a Masters in Project Management in terms of further study?
I would say definitely much more important. Your career is in Engineering as a whole so I would say don't even bother with a Masters in project management..
 

Infntie

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I can speak personally to this as I work with Graduate Project Managers and myself completed a civil engineering degree at USYD.

Experience counts more than the degree. Completing a double Civil/Project Management degree is only helpful insofar as it secures you an internship/part-time job while you are at university. I would argue that a sole engineering degree is more competitive than a double IF it is accompanied with rigorous industry experience. In fact, engineering undergraduates may find themselves working in project management at their part-time job and so will eventually compete with Project Management undergraduates upon graduation.

My point is, whatever degree you do, get relevant experience in the industry you want to work in. It is unlikely you will use much of what you learn at university at work. That is why experience counts the most.

Companies hire you for what you can do and not what you learnt in class.

Good luck!
 

enoilgam

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I can speak personally to this as I work with Graduate Project Managers and myself completed a civil engineering degree at USYD.

Experience counts more than the degree. Completing a double Civil/Project Management degree is only helpful insofar as it secures you an internship/part-time job while you are at university. I would argue that a sole engineering degree is more competitive than a double IF it is accompanied with rigorous industry experience. In fact, engineering undergraduates may find themselves working in project management at their part-time job and so will eventually compete with Project Management undergraduates upon graduation.

My point is, whatever degree you do, get relevant experience in the industry you want to work in. It is unlikely you will use much of what you learn at university at work. That is why experience counts the most.

Companies hire you for what you can do and not what you learnt in class.

Good luck!
Couldnt agree more with this post. Id stick with just engineering, enter the workforce then consider further training down the track. There are a multitude of different roles within civil engineering and projects. You don't want to pigeon hole yourself before you've had a chance to try different things. Once you've found what you like, then go for the higher qualification. I worked with a girl who did Civil Engineering. She started out as a Design Engineer but after a few years in it she decided to try something else because she "couldn't design for shit". Anyway, she stumbled into contract management and loved it. After a few years she did her Masters in Construction Law. If she had of done an Engineering Degree and a Masters of Engineering straight after, it would have been a waste of time and money.
 

enoilgam

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I can speak personally to this as I work with Graduate Project Managers and myself completed a civil engineering degree at USYD.

Experience counts more than the degree. Completing a double Civil/Project Management degree is only helpful insofar as it secures you an internship/part-time job while you are at university. I would argue that a sole engineering degree is more competitive than a double IF it is accompanied with rigorous industry experience. In fact, engineering undergraduates may find themselves working in project management at their part-time job and so will eventually compete with Project Management undergraduates upon graduation.

My point is, whatever degree you do, get relevant experience in the industry you want to work in. It is unlikely you will use much of what you learn at university at work. That is why experience counts the most.

Companies hire you for what you can do and not what you learnt in class.

Good luck!
Couldnt agree more with this post. Id stick with just engineering, enter the workforce then consider further training down the track. There are a multitude of different roles within civil engineering and projects. You don't want to pigeon hole yourself before you've had a chance to try different things. Once you've found what you like, then go for the higher qualification. I worked with a girl who did Civil Engineering. She started out as a Design Engineer but after a few years in it she decided to try something else because she "couldn't design for shit". Anyway, she stumbled into contract management and loved it. After a few years she did her Masters in Construction Law. If she had of done an Engineering Degree and a Masters of Engineering straight after, it would have been a waste of time and money.
 

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